Veterans Day

On November 11, 1918, at 11 AM, the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the Armistice was signed which ended the first World War. Thereafter, November 11 was celebrated as Armistice Day, with Congress making the date a federal holiday in 1938. After World War II, the date became known as Veterans Day, a change recognized by Congress in 1954, declaring it a day to honor all American veterans of all wars. In 1971, Veterans Day became a holiday celebrated on the fourth Monday in October, but it was returned to its original date, November 11, in 1977.

  • Veterans Day Home Page — A complete guide to Veterans Day celebrations from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Veterans’ Services — The Massachusetts Department of Veterans’ Services “provides information on state and federal benefits, including details about where and how to apply. In addition to resources for veterans and their dependents, the website contains information for members of the Guard and Reserve who have been called-up to active duty. The website is regularly updated and expanded to better serve the Commonwealth’s veterans and their families.”
  • InfoPlease: Veterans Day — A collection of facts, including the last living veterans of all American wars
  • History of Veterans Day — Veterans Day articles and videos from the History Channel website
  • U.S. Flag Home Page — All about the Stars and Stripes
  • Arlington National Cemetery — Information, a map, photographs and other information about Arlington National Cemetery
  • The American Battle Monuments Commission — The Commission was established by Congress at the request of General John J. Pershing to honor the accomplishments of the American Armed Forces where they have served since World War I, and maintains cemeteries and monuments around the world
  • Women Veterans — Resources and information for women veterans from the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW).
  • Veterans History Project — The Veterans History Project, a service of the Folklife Center of the Library of Congress, relies on volunteers to collect and preserve stories of wartime service, and includes reminiscences, letters, diaries, photographs and more.