Summer Reading

AS OF JUNE 3, 2014, WE HAVE RECEIVED THE SWAMPSCOTT MIDDLE SCHOOL ANDSWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SUMMER READING LISTS, AP ENGLISH LIST FOR JUNIORS, AND THE AMERICAN STUDIES LIST.

THINGS WE HAVEN’T RECEIVED YET: THE SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL AP ENGLISH LIST FOR SENIORS; AND LISTS FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS AT SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL.

2014-2015 SWAMPSCOTT MIDDLE SCHOOL READING LISTS

Summer Reading (Grade 5)
2014-2015 Swampscott Middle School Summer Reading List
School’s Motto: Better Readers Make Better Writers!
New this year: The English Teachers have fallen in love with the book, Wonder, by R. J. Palacio, and we have decided to have one School-wide Reading Book for all students entering 6th, 7th, and 8th grade in August of 2014. (Those entering 5th Grade can choose either Wonder or The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes.)
The goal of our summer reading program is to encourage students to read for enjoyment. To that end, we suggest that students make selections based on their reading level and on their interests. When students are not reading the one School-wide Selection this year, we ask that they choose books that they have never read and ones that meet their guardians’ approval. The children’s librarians and the Young Adult Librarian at the Swampscott Public Library can also make suggestions of classics, student favorites, and new recommended titles. Feel free to visit the Swampscott Public Library at any time.

2014 Summer Reading, Incoming Fifth Grade Assignment
Choose one (1). The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes or Wonder by , R. J. Palacio.
Dear Incoming Fifth Grade Students and Parents/Guardians,
You may read as many books as you would like, but one of them must be either The Hundred Dresses or Wonder. (You may read the book yourself, have someone read it to you, or you may use an audiotape.) Have fun! If the book doesn’t grab you right away, select another. We want you to be excited about reading.
When you enter 5th grade in August, your teachers will provide opportunities for you to show your understanding of your selections. Feel free to keep index cards of information to help you recall the book’s content. The cards could focus on any of the following:
Write a summary
List important words
Describe the setting
Share any character information
List the author’s purpose
Make personal connections
Rate the book and tell why

Sincerely,

The Fifth Grade Teachers

GRADE 5 SUGGESTIONS:
Never Mind: A Twin Novel by Avi
The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy by Birdsall, Jeanne
The Puzzling World of Winston Breen by Berlin, Eric
The Name of This Book is Secret by Bosch, Pseudonymous
Masterpiece by Broach, Elise
No Talking by Clements, Andrew
Vive la Paris by Codell, Esme Raji.
Free Baseball by Corbett, Sue
Extreme Animals: The Toughest Creatures on Earth by Davies, Nicola
The Birchbark House by Erdrich, Louise
Escape! The Story of the Great Houdini by Fleishman, Sid
The Liberation of Gabriel King by Going, K.L.
The Kid Who Ran For President by Gutman, Dan
Two Hot Dogs with Everything by Haven, Paul
The Haunting of Granite Falls and Others by Ibbotson, Eva
A Kick in the Head: An Everyday Guide to Poetic Forms by Janeczko, Paul B
The Phantom Tollbooth by Juster, Norton
1607: A New Look at Jamestown by Lange, Karen
The Willoughbys by Lowry, Lois
Porch Lies: Tales of Slicksters, Tricksters, and Other Wily Characters by McKissack, Patricia
Tripping Over the Lunch Lady: And Other School Stories by Mercado, Nancy
Three cups of Tea: Young Reader’s Edition by Mortenson, Greg
How to Steal a Dog by O’Connor, Barbara
Project Mulberry by Park, Linda Sue
Higher Power of Lucky by Patron, Susan
John Smith Escapes Again! by Schanzer, Rosalyn.
The Invention of Hugo Cabaret: A Novel in Words and Pictures by Selznick, Brian
My Name is Sally Little Song by Wood, Brenda
Little Leap Forward by Yue, Guo

Summer Reading (Grade 6)
2014-2015 Swampscott Middle School Summer Reading List
School’s Motto: Better Readers Make Better Writers!
New this year: The English Teachers have fallen in love with the book, Wonder, by R. J. Palacio, and we have decided to have one School-wide Reading Book for all students entering 6th, 7th, and 8th grade in August of 2014.
The goal of our summer reading program is to encourage students to read for enjoyment. To that end, we suggest that students make selections based on their reading level and on their interests. When students are not reading the one School-wide Selection this year, we ask that they choose books that they have never read and ones that meet their guardians’ approval. The children’s librarians and the Young Adult Librarian at the Swampscott Public Library can also make suggestions of classics, student favorites, and new recommended titles. Feel free to visit the Swampscott Public Library at any time.
Incoming Sixth Grade Assignment
Required: Wonder by R. J. Palacio
Dear Incoming Sixth Grade Students and Parents/Guardians,

We hope that students will read many books for enjoyment this summer, and we are asking for one of the selections to be Wonder, by R. J. Palacio. Since teachers will provide opportunities to discuss this novel when students return in August, it might be helpful for children to keep index cards of information or to use sticky notes to recall important issues in the novel.

On behalf of the entire sixth grade team, we hope you all have an enjoyable summer, full of both fun and learning. We are looking forward to a great start to the school year in the fall!

~ “Reading is a basic tool in the living of a good life”~
-Joseph Addison

Sincerely,

The Sixth Grade Teachers
ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS FOR GRADE 6
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan.
My Life with the Chimpanzees (revised edition) by Jane Goodall (Non-fiction biography)
The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone: Keys to Ancient Egypt by James Cross Giblin
The Color of My Words by Lynn Joseph
Homeless Bird by Gloria Whelan

Summer Reading (Grade 7)
2014-2015 Swampscott Middle School Summer Reading List
School’s Motto: Better Readers Make Better Writers!
New this year: The English Teachers have fallen in love with the book, Wonder, by R. J. Palacio, and we have decided to have one School-wide Reading Book for all students entering 6th, 7th, and 8th grade in August of 2014.
7th Grade Students have an additional requirement. See below.
The goal of our summer reading program is to encourage students to read for enjoyment. To that end, we suggest that students make selections based on their reading level and on their interests. When students are not reading the one School-wide Selection this year, we ask that they choose books that they have never read and ones that meet their guardians’ approval. The children’s librarians and the Young Adult Librarian at the Swampscott Public Library can also make suggestions of classics, student favorites, and new recommended titles. Feel free to visit the Swampscott Public Library at any time.
______________________________________________________________________
Incoming Seventh Grade Assignment
Required: Wonder by R. J. Palacio, and another choice from the mandatory list
The one selection from the mandatory choices should be purchased since an annotated book must be presented on the first day of school.
Dear Incoming Seventh Grade Students and Parents/Guardians,
You may read as many books as you would like. Have fun! If the book does not grab you right away, select another one. We want you to be excited about reading. When you return in August, teachers will provide opportunities for you to discuss the books as well as specific tasks.
In order to be well prepared, as you read the non-school-wide selection, you need to pay attention to characterization, plot, setting, author’s purpose, etc. (See below for specifics.)
We recommend that you purchase that book so that you can annotate it by underlining, writing in the margins, or circling parts of the text you wish to remember or challenge.
In addition to annotating, you must use sticky notes. We suggest you create a system using different colored sticky notes to separate the literary comments you are marking.
You must bring that book with you on the first day of school.
Sincerely,
The Seventh Grade Teachers

HOW TO READ
Be an active reader and annotate (mark your book) as you read!
You annotate by underlining, circling, and writing in the margins or on sticky notes.
What to annotate:
Important words
Words or ideas you don’t know, language
Important sentences
Questions
Predictions
Summaries
Central ideas (theme)
Character information
Criticisms and analysis
New ideas
Connections to other texts, self, world
Literary concepts (ex. tone, narrative, motif)
Reflections, personal response
Author’s purpose
Mandatory Choices for 7TH GRADE:
GRADE 7
Esperanza Rising by Pan Munoz-Ryan
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
When the Legends Die by Hal Borland
Chasing Redbird by Sharon Creech
Toning the Sweep by Angela Johnson
Heir Apparent by Vivian Vande Velde
Rewind by William Sleator
The Third Eye by Lois Duncan
Things Not Seen by Andrew Clements
Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson
Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko
The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi
Football Genius by Tim Green
Travel Team by Mike Lupica
Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voight
Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer
No More Dead Dogs by Gordon Korman
Mockingbird by Katheryn Erskine
The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

Summer Reading (Grade 8)
2014-2015 Swampscott Middle School Summer Reading List
School’s Motto: Better Readers Make Better Writers!
New this year: The English Teachers have fallen in love with the book, Wonder, by R. J. Palacio, and we have decided to have one School-wide Reading Book for all students entering 6th, 7th, and 8th grade in August of 2014.
7th and 8th Grade Students have an additional requirement. See below.
The goal of our summer reading program is to encourage students to read for enjoyment. To that end, we suggest that students make selections based on their reading level and on their interests. When students are not reading the one School-wide Selection this year, we ask that they choose books that they have never read and ones that meet their guardians’ approval. The children’s librarians and the Young Adult Librarian at the Swampscott Public Library can also make suggestions of classics, student favorites, and new recommended titles. Feel free to visit the Swampscott Public Library at any time.
Incoming Eighth Grade Assignment
Required: Wonder by R. J. Palacio and another choice from the mandatory list

GRADE 8 Students must purchase and annotate one of the * books.
Dear Eighth Grade Students,
In order to be well prepared, as you read, you need to pay attention to characterization, plot, setting, author’s purpose, etc. (See entire list below.)
You must own one of the * books. Annotate it by underlining, writing in the margins, or circling parts of the text you wish to remember or challenge. In addition, you must “sticky note” your book with 3 separate colors that focus on 3 areas from the list below.
(For example: yellow for all references to characterization, pink for all connections to theme, green for all points you want to challenge) This information will be needed for discussions and exercises that will occur during the first weeks of school.
You must bring the ANNOTATED, “STICKY-NOTED” book with you on the first day of school.
Sincerely,
The Eighth Grade Teachers

HOW TO READ
Be an active reader and annotate (mark your book) as you read!
You annotate by underlining, circling, and writing in the margins or on sticky notes.
What to annotate:
Important words
Words or ideas you don’t know, language
Important sentences
Questions
Predictions
Summaries
Central ideas (theme)
Character information (Focus on change/growth)
Criticisms and analysis
New ideas
Connections to other texts, self, world
Literary concepts (ex. tone, narrative, motif)
Reflections, personal response
Author’s purpose
You must choose one of the following 6 options:
*The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa-Fiction
A brilliant mathematician, the Professor, was seriously injured in a car accident and his short-term memory only lasts for 80 minutes. He can remember his theorems and favorite baseball players, but the Housekeeper must reintroduce herself and her son every morning, sometimes several times a day.
*Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson-Historical Fiction
As the Revolutionary War begins, thirteen-year old slave girl Isabel wages her own fight for freedom.
*Necessary Roughness by Marie G. Lee-Young Adult Fiction
Chan Kim has never felt like an outsider until his family moves from L.A. to a tiny town in Minnesota where the Kims are the only Asian family.
*Daniel Half Human by David Chotjewitz-Historical Fiction
At the dawn of Hitler’s rise to power in Germany in 1933, Daniel receives some life altering news. He is half-Jewish, and as a result, he is half-hated by neighbors, teachers and friends.
*Bomb by Steve Sheinkin-Non-Fiction
In December of 1938, a chemist in a German laboratory made a shocking discovery about a Uranium atom splitting in two, a discovery that launches the creation of the atomic bomb.
*Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Beals-Memoir
The landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling, Brown vs. Board of Education, brought the promise of integration to Little Rock, Arkansas. However, nothing could prevent the segregationists’ brutal organized campaign of terrorism.

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL AMERICAN STUDIES SUMMER READING: 2014-2015

Required Summer Reading: Please carefully annotate, as we will be discussing each of these books in class during the course of the first quarter.

For what should I annotate? Key quotes, symbolism, dialogue, tone, imagery, author’s “message.”

Summer Projects:
• CPI Students: Carefully and thoroughly annotate The Things They Carry and The House of Sand and Fog. We will be discussing these two books at the beginning of the school year.
• Honors Students: Ditto, above. Plus, do the “standard” creative project (on English Dept. website) for your optional book.
• All students: There will be a Summer Reading Written Assessment within the first week of school…

Required Summer Reading
(all students)
The Things They Carried (O’Brien)
The House of Sand and Fog (Dubus)

Honors Students:
(Select One)
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (Safran Foer)
Beloved (Morrison)
The Illustrated Man (Bradbury)
The Lace Reader (Barry)
Teacher Man (McCourt)
Ethan Frome (Wharton)
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Thompson)
The Joy Luck Club (Tan)
Invisible Man (Ellison)

If you have any questions during the summer, please email us:
Mr. Franklin: mr-f@comcast.net
Mrs. Green: green@swampscott.k12.ma.us

We will do our best to get back to you in relative short order…but remember: it’s summer, and we’re taking a break, too!

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH DEPARTMENT SUMMER READING 2014

Expectations for Summer Reading 2013

Summer Reading Creative Options
English Department 2013

The English Department presents creative project choices for students in accordance with Swampscott High School’s Mission Statement and Academic Expectations which state: “The mission of Swampscott High School is to prepare students to succeed in a diverse and evolving global society by promoting academic and personal excellence…” and, “Students will communicate effectively through multiple forms of expression and solve problems through analytical and critical thinking.” Summer reading plays a vital role in maintaining students’ close reading skills and allows students to prepare for the challenges of the upcoming curriculum.

Expectation: Students must complete a creative project from the list below for one non-required reading. This project is due the first day of classes. If you have questions about the projects, please email Ms. Ganci ganci@swampscott.k12.ma.us

CHOICES:
Soundtrack —
Your project will have:

1. A list of at least 10 songs each with explanations of connections to the themes, mood, character, and/or plot of the novel that is at least a page. These explanations will cite specific examples/quotations from the text and from the song in your analysis.
2. An attractive and visually relevant cover for your CD case.

Artistic Response —
Your project will have:

1. A work of art in response to your book using charcoal, pastels, oil, ink, paper, etc.
2. A one-page reflection on why in the text inspired you to create this piece that includes specific examples from the text in your reflection.

Graphic Novel —
Your project will include:

1. A four-page comic book adaptation of a chapter or important scene from your novel that includes words and images.
2. A one-page explanation of why you choose this moment in the novel. Use specific details and evidence from the novel in your explanations.

Film Adaptation —
Your project will include:

Pretend a big movie studio has hired you to adapt this novel into a film.
1. Three important passages from the novel that you would include in your film version with explanations of why you chose these moments and how they are connected to your thematic vision of the film.
2. A one-page explanation of your casting choices including images of actors you will cast.

Creative Assignment Rubric

NOTE: AP JUNIORS ASSIGNMENT IS BELOW FOLLOWING THE JUNIOR LIST

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER READING LIST FOR FRESHMAN: 2014
The Swampscott High School English Department presents its summer reading selections for the 2014-2015 school year in accordance with Swampscott High School’s Mission Statement and Academic Expectations which state: “The mission of Swampscott High School is to prepare students to succeed in a diverse and evolving global society by promoting academic and personal excellence…” and, “Students will communicate effectively through multiple forms of expression and solve problems through analytical and critical thinking.” Summer reading plays a vital role in maintaining students’ close reading skills and allows students to prepare for the challenges of the upcoming curriculum. Students taking 110 must read the required text plus two additional choice books from the list provided. Students taking 111 must read the required text and one additional choice book from the list. Students taking the Foundations course must read the required text and one additional choice book from the list. Please see the page entitled “Expectations for Summer Reading” for more information.

REQUIRED:
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho: The Alchemist is the magical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure as extravagant as any ever found. From his home in Spain he journeys to the markets of Tangiers and across the Egyptian desert to a fateful encounter with the alchemist.

CHOICES:

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card: Ender Wiggins is the result of a genetic breeding program and years of harsh, unforgiving training. Thinking he is only playing computer-simulated war games, Ender is really commanding the last great fleet on Earth.

Ellen Foster by Kay Gibbons: In a simple narrative voice, eleven-year-old Ellen tells the story of a childhood filled with family strife and parental loss. Her spunk and humor help her overcome adversity in this uplifting southern novel.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou: This is the moving and beautiful autobiography of a talented black woman confronting her own life with dignity.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams: The story of a British earthling plucked from his planet, and his subsequent adventures elsewhere in the universe.

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang: This comic book tells three different stories that merge into one. At the center of all stories is the importance of one’s heritage and culture and the obstacles of growing up.

Bee Season by Myla Goldberg: Eliza Naumann, a seemingly unremarkable nine-year-old, expects never to fit into her gifted family, but when Eliza sweeps her school and district spelling bees in quick succession, Saul takes it as a sign that she is destined for greatness. This is a coming-of-age-novel about being the outcast in a family of geniuses.

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff: This novel paints a frighteningly realistic picture of a world war breaking out in the 21st century. Told from the point of view of 15-year-old Manhattan native Daisy, the novel follows her arrival and her stay with cousins on a remote farm in England.

The House of Scorpion by Nancy Farmer: Matt discovers he is a clone in a future where clones are thought of as little more than animals. Matt is the clone of a very powerful drug lord, and because of this, he enjoys a much more comfortable life than most, but quickly realizes the dark side of this world.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher: When Clay Jenson plays the cassette tapes he received in a mysterious package he’s surprised to hear the voice of dead classmate Hannah Baker. He’s one of 13 people who receive Hannah’s story, which details the circumstances that led to her suicide.

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie: A pathological killer systematically murders ten strangers entrapped on an island.

Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes by Chris Crutcher: Eric “Moby” Calhoune, the fattest boy in high school, tries to help his badly scarred best friend, Sarah Byrnes, deal with a horrific event in her past. “A transcendent story of love, loyalty, and courage . . . Superb plotting, extraordinary characters and crackling narrative make this novel one to be devoured in a single unforgettable sitting.”

The Contender by Robert Lypsyte: Alfred Brooks, a seventeen-year-old boy who is struggling to become a championship boxer, must placate his Harlem gang and the white world as well.

Hoops by Walter Dean Myers: A young man with a talent for basketball hopes that his game will be his ticket out of the ghetto.

Candy by Kevin Brooks: When Joe meets Candy, it seems like a regular boy-meets-girl scenario. They chat over coffee, she gives him her number, and he writes her a song. But then Joe is drawn into Candy’s world — a world of drugs, violence, and desperation.

The Future of Us by Jay Asher: What if you could see how your life would unfold–just by clicking a button? It’s 1996, and less than half of all American high school students have ever used the Internet. Emma just got her first computer and an America Online CD-ROM. Josh is her best friend. They power up and log on–and discover themselves on Facebook, fifteen years in the future. Everybody wonders what their destiny will be. Josh and Emma are about to find out.

The Maze Runner by James Dashner: Thomas wakes up in an elevator, remembering nothing but his own name. He emerges into a world of about 60 teen boys who have learned to survive in a completely enclosed environment, subsisting on their own agriculture and supplies from below. A new boy arrives every 30 days. The original group has been in “the glade” for two years, trying to find a way to escape through a maze that surrounds their living space. They have begun to give up hope. Then a comatose girl arrives with a strange note, and their world begins to change.

The Boy Who Couldn’t Sleep and Never Had To by DC Pierson: Fifteen-year-old Darren Bennett lives in an entirely recognizable teenage world: he’s obsessed with science fiction and video games, bullied by his older brother, and completely baffled by the opposite sex. On the other hand, Darren’s new, socially awkward best friend, Eric Lederer, lives a life unrecognizable to everyone: Eric can’t sleep, at all, ever, a revelation he shares with Darren in strictest confidence.

Room: A Novel by Emma Donoghue: In many ways, Jack is a typical 5-year-old. He likes to read books, watch TV, and play games with his Ma. But Jack is different in a big way–he has lived his entire life in a single room, sharing the tiny space with only his mother and an unnerving nighttime visitor known as Old Nick. For Jack, Room is the only world he knows, but for Ma, it is a prison in which she has tried to craft a normal life for her son. When their insular world suddenly expands beyond the confines of their four walls, the consequences are piercing and extraordinary.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER READING LIST FOR SOPHOMORES: 2014
The Swampscott High School English Department presents its summer reading selections for the 2014-2015 school year in accordance with Swampscott High School’s Mission Statement and Academic Expectations which state: “The mission of Swampscott High School is to prepare students to succeed in a diverse and evolving global society by promoting academic and personal excellence…” and “Students will communicate effectively through multiple forms of expression and solve problems through analytical and critical thinking.” Summer reading plays a vital role in maintaining students’ close reading skills and allows students to prepare for the challenges of the upcoming curriculum. Students taking 120 must read the required text plus two additional choice books from the list provided. Students taking 121 must read the required text and one additional choice book from the list. Please see the page entitled “Expectations for Summer Reading” for more information.

REQUIRED:
Maus I by Art Spiegleman: “The Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus tells the story of Vladek Spiegelman, a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe, and his son, a cartoonist coming to terms with his father’s story of survival during the Holocaust. Its form, the cartoon (the Nazis are cats, the Jews mice), shocks us out of any lingering sense of familiarity and succeeds in ‘drawing us closer to the bleak heart of the Holocaust'”. (The New York Times).
CHOICES:

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury: In this classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don’t put out fires; they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury’s vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal – a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad.

Shoeless Joe Jackson by W.P. Kinsella: In this story, a baseball announcer’s voice very clearly says to the narrator, “If you build it, he will come.” He does (shoeless Joe Jackson, that is) and says, looking around the ball fields, “This must be heaven.” “No, it’s Iowa,” the narrator replies. At this point, the story is a curiosity more than anything else, its significance archival more than aesthetic, but it is the piece that will draw readers to the collection.

Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult: Nineteen Minutes recounts a deadly high school shooting rampage, its causes, and its aftermath.

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd: Living on a peach farm in South Carolina with her harsh, unyielding father, Lily Owens has shaped her entire life around one devastating, blurred memory – the afternoon her mother was killed, when Lily was four.

About a Boy by Nick Hornby: Hornby’s protaganist is Will Lightman, a perennial guest at life’s eternal cocktail party. Due to a happy accident of birth, Will has never had to work; but, as his friends have drifted away into meaningful marriages and careers, he finds himself, at 36, mostly alone, desperately hip, and leading the quintessential unexamined life.

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison: First published in 1965, The Bluest Eye is the story of a black girl who prays — with unforeseen consequences–for her eyes to turn blue so she will be accepted.

The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards: Haunted by the memory of growing up with a chronically ill sister, David makes a split-second decision. He asks Caroline to take his infant daughter to an institution, and when Norah wakes, he tells her that the second child was stillborn.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale is a frightening look at a not too distant future where sterility is the norm, and fertile woman are treated as cattle, to produce children for the upper class who cannot have any.

Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut: The novel is filled with scientists and G-men and even ordinary folks caught up in the game. These assorted characters chase each other around in search of the world’s most important and dangerous substance, a new form of ice that freezes at room temperature.

11 Seconds by Travis Roy: Within the 11 seconds that inspired this memoir, Travis Roy realized his dream, and then smashed into his nightmare. On an October night in 1995, Roy, a talented young hockey player, skated onto the ice for his varsity debut with Boston University. Eleven fateful seconds later, he was paralyzed from the neck down.

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer: When twenty-four-year-old Chistopher McCandless walked into the Alaskan wilderness alone, never to be seen alive again, he left behind a storm of controversy and conflicting emotions over this odyssey. A remarkable true story of idealism, naïveté, and the deeper questions of where the individual fits into society.

City of Thieves by David Benioff: Two teenage boys encounter cannibals, murderers, prostitutes, and assassins as they struggle to complete an impossible task during the freezing Siege of Leningrad in this funny, shocking, and briskly written tome.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley: This is a classic fantasy of the future where babies are produced in bottles and people exist in a mechanized world without a soul.

Sophie’s World by Joestein Gaardner: Sophie is about to turn 15 when she receives a letter and as she answers; she learns about major schools of thought, and philosophers: Socrates, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hegel, Locke and Hobbes. This is an exploration of time, God, science and politics through all of the great philosophical concepts.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon: Joe Kavalier, a young artist who has also been trained in the art of Houdini-esque escape, has just pulled off his greatest feat to date: smuggling himself out of Nazi-occupied Prague. He is looking to make big money, fast, so that he can bring his family to freedom. His cousin, Brooklyn’s own Sammy Clay, is looking for a collaborator to create the heroes, stories, and art for the latest novelty to hit the American dreamscape: the comic book.

Big Mouth and Ugly Girl by Joyce Carol Oates: Ever make a stupid comment or joke, or say something you obviously didn’t mean? Of course you have — we all have. Was it ever taken out of context? Written in the wake of some highly publicized school shootings, Big Mouth & Ugly Girl takes a look at the shock waves that emanate from an overheard comment muttered in sarcasm, and the overzealous reaction of the school and surrounding community that follows.

Black Mass by Dennis Lehr and Gerard O’Neill: In the spring of 1988, Boston Globe reporters Dick Lehr and Gerard O’Neill set out to write the story of two infamous brothers from the insular Irish enclave of South Boston: Jim “Whitey” Bulger and his younger brother Billy. Whitey was the city’s most powerful gangster and a living legend–tough, cunning, without conscience, and above all, smart.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is an unforgettable story of a mental ward in which the despotic Nurse Ratched reigns over the doctor and all the inhabitants. She exercises a somewhat cultic tactics to render her patients completely submissive.

Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen: When reality got “too dense” for 18-year-old Susanna Kaysen, she was hospitalized. It was 1967, and reality was too dense for many people. But few who are labeled mad and locked up for refusing to stick to an agreed-upon reality possess Kaysen’s lucidity in sorting out a maelstrom of contrary perceptions.

Sold by Patricia McCormick: The book is written in poetic free verse in a very personal way through the main character’s eyes. Lakshmi, 13, knows nothing about the world beyond her village shack in the Himalayas of Nepal, and when her family loses the little it has in a monsoon, she grabs a chance to work as a maid in the city so she can send money back home. What she doesn’t know is that her stepfather has sold her into prostitution.

Swallow Me Whole by Nate Powell: This graphic novel is a complex tale of two adolescent step-siblings struggling not only through the usual teenager problems of identify, family and friends but also mental illness, obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie: The chronicle of Arnold Spirit, aka Junior, a Spokane Indian from Wellpinit, WA. The bright 14-year-old was born with water on the brain, is regularly the target of bullies, and loves to draw. He says, “I think the world is a series of broken dams and floods, and my cartoons are tiny little lifeboats.” He expects disaster when he transfers from the reservation school to the rich, white school in Reardan, but soon finds himself making friends with both geeky and popular students and starting on the basketball team.

Blankets by Craig Thompson: Wrapped in the landscape of a blustery Wisconsin winter, Blankets explores the sibling rivalry of two brothers growing up in the isolated country, and the budding romance of two coming-of-age lovers. A tale of security and discovery, of playfulness and tragedy, of a fall from grace and the origins of faith.

Forgotten Fire by Adam Bagdasarian: Forced to watch his father escorted out of their lives by Turkish police, his brothers shot to death in their backyard, his grandmother murdered by a rock-wielding guard, and his sister take poison rather than be raped by soldiers, 12-year-old Vahan Kendarian abruptly begins to learn what his father meant when he used to say, “This is how steel is made. Steel is made strong by fire.”

Looking for Alaska by John Green: Miles Halter is fascinated by famous last words–and tired of his safe life at home. He leaves for boarding school to seek what the dying poet Francois Rabelais called the “Great Perhaps.” Much awaits Miles at Culver Creek, including Alaska Young. Clever, funny, screwed-up, and dead sexy, Alaska will pull Miles into her labyrinth and catapult him into the Great Perhaps.

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER READING LIST FOR JUNIORS: 2014
The Swampscott High School English Department presents its summer reading selections for the 2014-2015 school year in accordance with Swampscott High School’s Mission Statement and Academic Expectations which state: “The mission of Swampscott High School is to prepare students to succeed in a diverse and evolving global society by promoting academic and personal excellence…” and, “Students will communicate effectively through multiple forms of expression and solve problems through analytical and critical thinking.” Summer reading plays a vital role in maintaining students’ close reading skills and allows students to prepare for the challenges of the upcoming curriculum. Students taking 130 must read the required text plus two additional choice books from the list provided. Students taking 131 must read the required text and one additional choice book from the list. Please see the page entitled “Expectations for Summer Reading” for more information. American Studies students have their own lists and assignments. If you are taking that course, please see Mr. Franklin for details. AP Language and Composition students have a specific assignment and need to contact Mr. Kohut for details.

REQUIRED:
Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward: A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch’s father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn’t show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn’t much to save. Her brother Skeetah is sneaking scraps for his prized pitbull’s new litter. Meanwhile, brothers Randall and Junior try to stake their claim in a family long on child’s play and short on parenting.

CHOICES:
The Chosen by Chaim Potok: The odyssey of two young men journeying from boyhood to manhood, set against the background of the conflicts and traditions of Hasidic and Orthodox Jews.

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan: An instant bestseller, this startlingly original debut novel tells the emotionally honest and intensely moving story of several generations of Chinese-American women and their families, illuminating the special mysteries of the bonds between mothers and daughters.

The Color of Water by James McBride: As an adult, James McBride finally persuaded his mother to tell her story – a story of a rabbi’s daughter, born in Poland and raised in the South, who fled to Harlem, married a black man, founded a church, and raised twelve children.

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines: In late 1940’s Louisiana, a poor, uneducated black youth is convicted of murder for his unwitting role in a liquor store holdup and the ensuing shoot-out.

Plainsong by Kent Haruf: Kent Haruf reveals a whole community as he interweaves the stories of a pregnant high school girl, a lonely teacher, a pair of boys abandoned by their mother, and a couple of crusty bachelors farmers.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath: Sylvia Plath’s autobiographical novel about a young woman on the brink of madness and suicide.

The Assistant by Bernard Malamud: Frank Alpine, a drifter, participates in the robbery and beating of a poor Jewish grocer. Feeling guilt, Frank is drawn back to the store to seek forgiveness. He begins to work at the store and falls in love with the grocer’s daughter. However, Frank has great difficulty giving up his dishonest ways, even when it costs him the daughter’s love.

Townie by Andre Dubus III: In this memoir Andre Dubus III tells stories about growing up in working class Massachusetts under the shadow of a famous and distant father.

Bodega Dreams by Ernesto Quinonez: This powerful, darkly funny debut novel brilliantly evokes the trials of Chino, a smart promising young man who finds himself over his head in an urban underworld of switchblades and violence.

The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski: Born mute, speaking only in sign, Edgar Sawtelle leads an idyllic life with his parents on their farm in remote northern Wisconsin. For generations, the Sawtelles have raised and trained a fictional breed of dog whose thoughtful companionship is epitomized by Almondine, Edgar’s lifelong friend and ally. But with the unexpected return of Claude, Edgar’s paternal uncle, turmoil consumes the Sawtelles’ once peaceful home.

She’s Come Undone by Wally Lamb: In this extraordinary coming-of-age story, Wally Lamb invites us to hitch a ride on a journey of love, pain, and renewal with the most heartbreakingly comical heroine to come along in years. Meet Dolores Price. She’s thirteen, wise-mouthed but wounded, having bid her childhood goodbye.

The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore: This non-fiction book explores questions about race, economics, and education and challenges readers to think about the variables that lead us down a specific path in life.

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger: A dazzling novel in the most untraditional fashion, this is the remarkable story of Henry DeTamble, a dashing, adventuresome librarian who travels involuntarily through time, and Clare Abshire, an artist whose life takes a natural sequential course.

The Road by Cormac McCarthy: McCarthy sets his new novel, The Road, in a post-apocalyptic blight of gray skies that drizzle ash, a world in which all matter of wildlife is extinct, starvation is not only prevalent but nearly all-encompassing, and marauding bands of cannibals roam the environment with pieces of human flesh stuck between their teeth

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole: Meet Ignatius J. Reilly, the hero of John Kennedy Toole’s tragicomic tale, A Confederacy of Dunces. This 30-year-old medievalist lives at home with his mother in New Orleans, pens his magnum opus on Big Chief writing pads he keeps hidden under his bed, and relays to anyone who will listen the traumatic experience he once had on a Greyhound Scenicruiser bound for Baton Rouge.

Lush Life by Richard Price: Price (Clockers) turns his unrelenting eye on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in this manic crescendo of a novel that explores the repercussions of a seemingly random shooting. When bartender Ike Marcus is shot to death after barhopping with friends, NYPD Det. Matty Clark and his team first focus on restaurant manager and struggling writer Eric Cash, who claims the group was accosted by would-be muggers, despite eyewitnesses saying otherwise.

Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer: The tragedy that took the lives of experienced mountain guides and novice climbers in a raging blizzard atop Mt. Everest in 1996 is chronicled with clarity, poignancy, and brutal honesty by one who witnessed the even first-hand.

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom: This novel is a magical chronicle of Mitch and Morrie’s time together, of a teacher’s gift to a student, and a heartfelt lesson of life and the things that are of true value.

Ender’s Shadow by Orson Scott Card: Bean is in Battle School with Ender Wiggins and becomes his right hand, his strategist, and his friend. He is there with Ender at the final battle. This is his story. A parallel novel to the best seller Ender’s Game.

In Country by Bobby Ann Mason: Sam Hughes, a contemporary girl, searches to understand who her father was and what the Vietnam War that killed him was about.

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan: An instant bestseller, this startlingly original debut novel tells the emotionally honest and intensely moving story of several generations of Chinese-American women and their families, illuminating the special mysteries of the bonds between mothers & daughters.

Gone, Baby, Gone by Dennis Lehane: Private detectives Kenzie and Gennaro, who live in the same working-class Dorchester neighborhood of Boston where they grew up, have gone to visit drug dealer Cheese in prison because they think he’s involved in the kidnapping of 4-year-old Amanda McCready.

Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk: The consequences of media saturation are the basis for an urban nightmare in Lullaby, Chuck Palahniuk’s darkly comic and often dazzling thriller. Assigned to write a series of feature articles investigating SIDS, troubled newspaper reporter Carl Streator begins to notice a pattern among the cases he encounters: each child was read the same poem prior to his or her death.

Smashed: The Story of a Drunken Girlhood by Koren Zailckas: This isn’t just one girl’s story of sneaking drinks in junior high, creeping out for night-long keg parties in high school and binge-drinking weeknights and weekends through college—it’s also a valuable cautionary tale. At 24 (her present age), Zailckas gave up drinking after a decade of getting drunk, having blackouts and experiencing brushes with comas, date rape and suicide.

My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult: Kate Fitzgerald has a rare form of leukemia. Her sister, Anna, was conceived to provide a donor match for procedures that become increasingly invasive. At 13, Anna hires a lawyer so that she can sue her parents for the right to make her own decisions about how her body is used when a kidney transplant is planned. Meanwhile, Jesse, the neglected oldest child of the family, is out setting fires, which his firefighter father, Brian, inevitably puts out.

Bleachers by John Grisham: With Bleachers John Grisham departs again from the legal thriller to experiment with a character-driven tale of reunion, broken high school dreams, and missed chances. While the book falls short of the compelling storytelling that has made Grisham a bestselling author, it is nonetheless a diverting novella that succeeds as light fiction.

Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld: Curtis Sittenfeld’s poignant and occasionally angst-ridden debut novel Prep is the story of Lee Fiora, a South Bend, Indiana, teenager who wins a scholarship to the prestigious Ault school, an East Coast institution where “money was everywhere on campus, but it was usually invisible.” As we follow Lee through boarding school, we witness firsthand the triumphs and tragedies that shape our heroine’s coming-of-age.

Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation by Jeff Chang: Many good books have been written about the history of hip-hop music and the generation that nurtured it. Can’t Stop Won’t Stop ranks among the best. Jeff Chang covers the music–from its Jamaican roots in the late 1960s to its birth in the Bronx; its eventual explosion from underground to the American mainstream–with style, including DJs, MCs, b-boys, graffiti art, Black Nationalism, groundbreaking singles and albums, and the street parties that gave rise to a genuine movement.

House Rules by Jodi Picoult: Jacob Hunt is a teenage boy with Asperger’s syndrome. He’s hopeless at reading social cues or expressing himself well to others, and like many kids with AS, Jacob has a special focus on one subject–in his case, forensic analysis. He’s always showing up at crime scenes, thanks to the police scanner he keeps in his room, and telling the cops what they need to do…and he’s usually right. But then his town is rocked by a terrible murder and, for a change, the police come to Jacob with questions.

Columbine by Dave Cullen: In this revelatory book, Dave Cullen debunks the myths and produces a profile of teen killers that burrows to the core of psychopathology. He reveals two radically different killers: Eric Harris, the callously brutal mastermind, and Dylan Klebold, the quivering depressive who journaled obsessively about love and attended the Columbine prom three days before opening fire.

Zeitoun by Dave Eggers: Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a successful Syrian-born painting contractor, decides to stay in New Orleans and protect his property while his family flees. After the levees break, he uses a small canoe to rescue people, before being arrested by an armed squad and swept powerlessly into a vortex of bureaucratic brutality.

Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder: This compelling and inspiring book shows how one person can work wonders. In medical school, Paul Farmer found his life’s calling: to cure infectious diseases and to bring the lifesaving tools of modern medicine to those who need them most. Kidder’s magnificent account takes us from Harvard to Haiti, Peru, Cuba, and Russia as Farmer changes minds and practices through his dedication to the philosophy that “the only real nation is humanity.”

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides: Eugenides’s tantalizing, macabre first novel begins with a suicide, the first of the five bizarre deaths of the teenage daughters in the Lisbon family; the rest of the work, set in the author’s native Michigan in the early 1970s, is a backward-looking quest as the male narrator and his nosy, pals describe how they strove to understand the odd clan of this first chapter.

Manhunt-The Twelve Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer by James Swanson: For 12 days after his brazen assassination of Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth was at large, and in Manhunt, historian James L. Swanson tells the vivid, fully documented tale of his escape and the wild, massive pursuit. Get a taste of the daily drama from this timeline of the desperate search.

Where Men Win Glory by John Krakauer: In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer reveals how an entire country was deliberately deceived by those at the very highest levels of the US army and government. Infused with the power and authenticity readers have come to expect from Krakauer’s storytelling, Where Men Win Glory exposes shattering truths about men and war.

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien: They carried malaria tablets, love letters, 28-pound mine detectors, dope, illustrated Bibles, each other. And, if they made it home alive, they carried unrelenting images of a nightmarish war that history is only just beginning to absorb. Since its first publication, this novel has become an unparalleled Vietnam testament, a classic work of American literature, and a profound study of men at war that illuminates the capacity, and the limits, of the human heart and soul.

JUNIORS: AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION STUDENTS WITH MR. KOHUT
The two required books are Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan and David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell.

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER READING LIST FOR SENIORS: 2014
The Swampscott High School English Department presents its summer reading selections for the 2014-2015 school year in accordance with Swampscott High School’s Mission Statement and Academic Expectations which state: “The mission of Swampscott High School is to prepare students to succeed in a diverse and evolving global society by promoting academic and personal excellence…” and, “Students will communicate effectively through multiple forms of expression and solve problems through analytical and critical thinking.” Summer reading plays a vital role in maintaining students’ close reading skills and allows students to prepare for the challenges of the upcoming curriculum. Students taking 141 must read the required text and one additional choice book from the list. Please see the page entitled “Expectations for Summer Reading” for more information. Students taking AP English have a separate, specific reading list and assignment. AP Literature and Composition students should see Ms. Blum for the specific summer reading assignment.

REQUIRED:
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga: In this darkly comic début novel set in India, Balram, a chauffeur, murders his employer, justifying his crime as the act of a “social entrepreneur.” In a series of letters to the Premier of China, in anticipation of the leader’s upcoming visit to Balram’s homeland, the chauffeur recounts his transformation from an honest, hardworking boy growing up in “the Darkness”—those areas of rural India where education and electricity are equally scarce, and where villagers banter about local elections “like eunuchs discussing the Kama Sutra”—to a determined killer. He places the blame for his rage squarely on the avarice of the Indian élite, among whom bribes are commonplace, and who perpetuate a system in which many are sacrificed to the whims of a few. Adiga’s message isn’t subtle or novel, but Balram’s appealingly sardonic voice and acute observations of the social order are both winning and unsettling. (The New Yorker)

CHOICE BOOKS:
The Reader by Bernard Schlink: This mesmerizing novel is a story of love and secrets, horror and compassion, unfolded against the haunted landscape of post World War II Germany.

God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy: Set mainly in Kerala, India, in 1969, it is the story of Rahel and her twin brother Estha, who learn that their whole world can change in a single day, that love and life can be lost in a moment.

The Red Tent by Anita Diamant: Author Anita Diamant, in the voice of Dinah, gives an insider’s look at the details of women’s lives in biblical times and a chronicle of their earthy stories and long-ignored histories.

Bel Canto by Ann Patchett: Somewhere in South America, at the home of the country’s vice president, a lavish birthday party is being held in honor of Mr. Hosokawa, a powerful Japanese businessman. Roxanne Coss, opera’s most revered soprano, has mesmerized the international guests with her singing. It is a perfect evening — until a band of gun-wielding terrorists breaks in through the air-conditioning vents and takes the entire party hostage.

The Sound of Waves by Yukio Mishima: Set in a remote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. A young fisherman is entranced at the sight of the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village. They fall in love, but must then endure the calumny and gossip of the villagers.

The Life of Pi by Yann Martel: Life of Pi is a masterful and utterly original novel that is at once the story of a young castaway who faces immeasurable hardships on the high seas, and a meditation on religion, faith, art and life that is as witty as it is profound.

Waiting by Ha Jin: This is the story of Lin Kong, a man living in two worlds, struggling with the conflicting claims of two utterly different women as he moves through the political minefields of a society designed to regulate his every move and stifle the promptings of his innermost heart

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro: From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day comes a devastating new novel of innocence, knowledge, and loss. As children Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy were students at Hailsham, an exclusive boarding school secluded in the English countryside. It was a place of mercurial cliques and mysterious rules where teachers were constantly reminding their charges of how special they were.

In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez: Set during the waning days of the Trujillo dictatorship in the Dominican Republica in 1960, this extraordinary novel tells the story the Mirabal sisters, three young wives and mothers who are assassinated after visiting their jailed husbands.

The Aguero Sisters by Christina Garcia: Garcia’s magisterial work opens with a murder. In Cuba’s shimmering Zapata Swamp, Blanca Aguero turns in time to see her naturalist husband, Ignacio, point a gun at her and pull the trigger. At the heart of the novel that then unfolds are the two daughters of the ill-fated couple.

High Fidelity by Nick Hornby: High Fidelity is the story of Rob, a pop music junkie who runs his own semi-failing record store. His girlfriend Laura has just left him for Ian from the flat upstairs. Rob is both miserable and relieved. After all, could he have spent his life with someone who has a bad record collection?

The History of Love by Nicole Krauss: The History of Love spans of period of over 60 years and takes readers from Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe to present day Brighton Beach. At the center of each main character’s psyche is the issue of loneliness, and the need to fill a void left empty by lost love.

When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa by Peter Godwin: In 1996 when his father suffers a heart attack, Godwin returns to Africa and sparks the central revelation of the book—the father is Jewish and has hidden it from Godwin and his siblings. As his father’s health deteriorates, so does Zimbabwe.

Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid: With Annie John, the story of a young girl coming of age in Antigua, Kincaid tears open the theme that lies at the heart of all her fierce, incantatory novels: the ambivalent and essential bonds created by a mother’s love.

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini: With his second novel, Khaled Hosseini proves beyond a shadow of doubt that The Kite Runner was no flash in the Afghan pan. Once again set in Afghanistan, the story twists and turns its way through the turmoil and chaos that ensued following the fall of the monarchy in 1973, but focuses mainly on the lives of two women, thrown together by fate.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: Few have failed to be charmed by the witty and independent spirit of Elizabeth Bennet. Her early determination to dislike Mr. Darcy is a prejudice only matched by the folly of his arrogant pride. Their first impressions give way to true feelings in a comedy profoundly concerned with happiness and how it might be achieved.

The Commitments by Roddy Doyle: “Dublin soul” is what the lads call it. Obsessed with James Brown, Percy Sledge and other rhythm-and-blues greats from across the ocean, young Jimmy Rabbitte organizes the “world’s hardest working band,” made up of fellow Dubliners, and sets out to teach the town a lesson about soul.

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dai Sijie and Ina Rilke: This beautifully presented novella tracks the lives of two teens, childhood friends who have been sent to a small Chinese village for “re-education” during Mao’s Cultural Revolution. Sons of doctors and dentists, their days are now spent muscling buckets of excrement up the mountainside and mining coal.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson: The book is a thriller on many levels: It is the mystery about what happened to the heiress of Swedish family, the Vangers, it is about a journalist’s crusade to redeem his reputation, and it is about a computer-genius named Lisabeth who enacts vendettas and struggles to interact with other humans.

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding: Bridget Jones Diary follows the fortunes of a single girl on an optimistic but doomed quest for self-improvement.

Lucky by Alice Sebold: One night near the end of her freshman year at Syracuse University, Alice Sebold was raped while walking home through a park. From that experience comes Lucky, an account of the rape and the year that followed it.

Black Water by Joyce Carol Oates: The senator. The girl. The accident. Oates creates an unforgettable allegory about power, morals, and ambition.

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi: Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi’s wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution.

So Far From God by Ana Castillo: Sofia and her fated daughters, Fe, Esperanza, Caridad, and la Loca, endure hardship and enjoy love in the sleepy New Mexico hamlet of Tome, a town teeming with marvels where the comic and the horrific, the real and the supernatural, reside.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon: Despite his overwhelming fear of interacting with people, Christopher, a mathematically-gifted, autistic fifteen-year-old boy, decides to investigate the murder of a neighbor’s dog and uncovers secret information about his mother.

Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia by Marya Hornbacher: Based on research and her own battle with anorexia and bulimia, which left her with permanent physical ailments and nearly killed her, Hornbacher’s book explores the mysterious and ruthless realm of self-starvation, which has its grip firmly around the minds and bodies of adolescents all across this country.

A Million Little Pieces by James Frey: James Frey’s memoir of drug addition and recovery was a bestseller even before Oprah Winfrey picked it for her book club in 2005, but the subsequent revelations about discrepancies between the story and the author’s real life touched off a national debate about the line between fact and fiction.

Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt: Despite impoverishing his family because of his alcoholism, McCourt’s father passed on to his son a gift for superb storytelling. He told him about the great Irish heroes, the old days in Ireland, the people in their Limerick neighborhood, and the world beyond their shores.

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith: This novel is a mash-up of the original story of the Bennett sisters who at the mercy of the world they live in, balance their desire to be loved with the need to make a economically good marriage AND some awesome zombie-killing!

All Souls by Michael Patrick MacDonald: In this plainly written, powerful memoir, MacDonald, now 32, details not only his own story of growing up in Southie, Boston’s Irish Catholic enclave, but examines the myriad ways in which the media and law enforcement agencies exploit marginalized working-class communities. MacDonald was one of nine children born (of several fathers) to his mother, Helen MacDonald, a colorful woman who played the accordion in local Irish pubs to supplement her welfare checks.

The Double Bind by Chris Bohjalian: Readers will be startled to learn early on that the heroine of this engrossing puzzle, 26-year-old Laurel Estabrook, was born in West Egg. Wait a minute, wasn’t West Egg where Jay Gatsby lived? Laurel works in a Burlington, Vt., homeless shelter and is trying to overcome mental and physical scars incurred from a brutal assault some six years earlier.

Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay : Sarah Starzynski, a ten-year-old Parisian girl born to Jewish parents, is captured in the round-up of June 16, 1942, and imprisoned with almost 10,000 others in an indoor cycling arena, the Vélodrome d’Hiver, awaiting transportation to Auschwitz. When the police arrive, she has just time to hide her younger brother in a concealed closet in their apartment, locking him in and promising to return. Sixty years later, Julia Jarmond, an American journalist married to a Frenchman, researching for a story on the “Vél d’Hiv,” stumbles on the trail of Sarah’s family, and becomes obsessed with trying to discover her fate.

The Body of Christopher Creed by Carol Plum-Ucci: The often-tortured class weirdo has disappeared, leaving an enigmatic note on the school library computer. Is he a runaway, a suicide, a murder victim?

Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine Harden: The shocking story of one of the few North Koreans born in a political prison to have escaped and survived.

Cod by Mark Kurlansky: The biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character.

Banana by Dan Koeppel: A gripping chronicle of the myth, mystery, and uncertain fate of the world’s most popular fruit

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak: Death himself narrates the World War II-era story of Liesel Meminger from the time she is taken, at age nine, to live in Molching, Germany, with a foster family in a working-class neighborhood of tough kids, acid-tongued mothers, and loving fathers who earn their living by the work of their hands. The child arrives having just stolen her first book–although she has not yet learned how to read–and her foster father uses it, The Gravediggers Handbook, to lull her to sleep when she’s roused by regular nightmares about her younger brother’s death.

AP Literature and Composition Summer Reading Assignments
WE DO NOT HAVE ANY INFORMATION ON THE 2013 AP COURSE LISTS.