Difference between revisions of "Forest River Lead Works"

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Founded and incorporated in 1840 as the Forest River Lead company, they are situated on Lafayette Street at Forest River. The company was active for 40 years under this name. In 1884, they were purchased by the Chadwick Lead works of Boston. After remodeling and enlarging the works, the name was changed to Forest River Lead works, to avoid conflicting with the original company name.
 
Founded and incorporated in 1840 as the Forest River Lead company, they are situated on Lafayette Street at Forest River. The company was active for 40 years under this name. In 1884, they were purchased by the Chadwick Lead works of Boston. After remodeling and enlarging the works, the name was changed to Forest River Lead works, to avoid conflicting with the original company name.
After a large fire on March 5, 1897, the entire main factory was destroyed. After rebuilding they became the largest lead mills facility, creating 6,000 tons per year to be used in paint and other trades.
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After a large fire on March 5, 1897, the entire main factory was destroyed. After rebuilding they became the largest '''lead mills''' facility, creating 6,000 tons per year to be used in paint and other trades.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==
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[http://innopac.noblenet.org/search/X?SEARCH=old+naumkeag&SORT=D&searchscope=24 Old Naumkeag] by C. H. Webber, p. 206
 
[http://innopac.noblenet.org/search/X?SEARCH=old+naumkeag&SORT=D&searchscope=24 Old Naumkeag] by C. H. Webber, p. 206
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[[Category:Browse Index]]
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[[Category:Businesses]]

Revision as of 11:34, 10 June 2009

Founded and incorporated in 1840 as the Forest River Lead company, they are situated on Lafayette Street at Forest River. The company was active for 40 years under this name. In 1884, they were purchased by the Chadwick Lead works of Boston. After remodeling and enlarging the works, the name was changed to Forest River Lead works, to avoid conflicting with the original company name. After a large fire on March 5, 1897, the entire main factory was destroyed. After rebuilding they became the largest lead mills facility, creating 6,000 tons per year to be used in paint and other trades.

See Also

Illustrated History of Salem and environs by Charles B. Gillespie, p. 163.

Old Naumkeag by C. H. Webber, p. 206