Hamilton Hall

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  • Located at 9 Chestnut Street, this famous building designed by Samuel McIntire, was built in 1805 and named in honor of Alexander Hamilton (first secretary of the treasury), who had visited Salem, where he had many admirers. In 1971, it was named a Registered National Historic Landmark for its architectural and historic significance.
  • The hall was built by wealthy Federalist merchants who wanted a place for dances and social gatherings after growing tensions with the Republicans resulted in the two groups refusing to share an assembly hall.
  • The hall's upstairs ballroom, where tall gilt-framed mirrors (imported from Russia) reflect the arched windows, makes the hall notable. The ballroom also has a wooden floor set upon springs, which cushions the movements of the dancers. Only a few of these type of floors remain intact in the country.
  • The hall was used for many years by dance teachers, drawing teachers as far away as Boston such as Lorenzo Papanti, Massachusett's most important dancing master of the 19th century. Henry O. Upton was another popular Salem dance teacher. Harriet James was another dance teacher in 1940's to the 1970's.
  • Two other distinct features are the musician's balcony and on the first floor, a rare Rumford Roaster, which in the early 1800's was the most up-to-date means of cooking for large numbers. John Remond was a popular caterer who used the first floor on the building.
  • Hamilton Hall has maintained its original use as gathering place for dances, assemblies and community events. A group called the Ladies Committee of Hamilton Hall has sponsored lectures on a variety of current events and foreign affairs since 1946. These are very well attended.
  • Proceeds from the lecture series help to fund upkeep and renovation of this historic hall. Interior work was done in 1920 and 1948. In 1988, bricks were repointed and windows repaired.
  • Hamilton Hall became a non-profit organization in 1985.

See Also

  • Vertical File in Salem Collection - Hamilton Hall
  • "After 200 years, Hamilton Hall mission remains the same" Salem Evening News, April 30, 2005.
  • "A Hall with a History" Salem Evening News, Nov. 19, 1992. p. 11
  • "Hamilton Hall and Pingree House - National Landmarks" Salem Evening News, Apr. 14, 1971. p. 18
  • "Hamilton Hall bicentennial recalls era of lavish parties, presidential visits", Salem News, Mar.21, 2005
  • "Hamilton Hall Lecture series flourishes in 65th year" Salem News, Nov. 18, 2010, p.11