35 William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 1

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 1

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 2

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 2

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 3

Col. William Augustus Washington to Samuel Phillips, 1797, page 3

Bushfield, May 22d 1797

M¥’ Dr Sir

It is a long time since I have had the pleasure of Letter from you; a few lines now & then informing me of the progrefs of my Sons, would confer a singular obligation on me. I have proof of your candor which I assure you my Dr Sir I consider as the surest token of Friendship & esteem. The affectionate manner in which my Son, in all his Letters mentions you, seems as if you were considered by him more as a parent than a common Friend. You have certainly Sir placed me under obligations to you that I fear I can never repay. accept the acknowledgments of a grateful heart; whilst you have thus confired obligations on me, to ask for further favors would be ingratitude. I shall therefore only inclose you my Son Augustines last letter to me, and unlefs it should be perfectly convenient to you to comply with his request, I would not wish you to put yourself to the smallest inconvenience; If it should be otherwise, I can only say that I should be rendered extremely happy. In my last Letter to my Son I mentioned to him a remittance which I expected would have been made about that time, a disappointment took place which I was not apprised of till last month. The difficulty of procuring Bills on Boston or United States Bank Notes, in the part of the Country I live induces me to give this letter open to my Friend Genl. Lee, who is on his way to Alexandria & will procure one or the other & inclose in this letter to you. I hope it will speedily get to your hand with 300 Dollars – & that I shall never in future be so backward.
I have met with severe affliction since I had the pleasure of seeing you; the lofs of a beloved wife, myself a Cripple almost with the Gout, which has confined me the whole winter to my Bed & Room, and now my Dr Sir I am beholding the daily decline of a. beloved Daughter; cut off in the Bloom of youth by an incurable pulmonary complaint; she is now so far gone that we
expect her difsolution daily.

With the sincerest respect & Esteem I am Dr Sir

Your Most Ob Serv

Wm. Augt. Washington