Transcription of Houghton Letter, Feb. 10, 1863

A transcription of the letter is below.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 1. Phillips Academy  Archives and Special Collections.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 1.
Phillips Academy Archives and Special Collections.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 2. Phillips Academy  Archives and Special Collections.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 2.
Phillips Academy Archives and Special Collections.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 3. Phillips Academy  Archives and Special Collections.

Eugene Houghton. February 10, 1863 page 3.
Phillips Academy Archives and Special Collections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcription by Nadia Shahab Diaz, class of 2017

TEXT

Andover Feb 10, 1863

Mr. Warren,

Dear friend, I

hope you will excuse my tardiness
in acknowledging your letter
containing fifteen dollars. I have
been quite unwell for a few days
but am well now.
You asked me what berth I
wanted if I went sea. I did not
expect any and even berth but
that of a common sailor.
As to staying with Mr. Hayware,
I should like it very much if
I could not go as a solider or
sailor, he was ever kind to me
and shall allways remember
the two years and a half spent
on his place as a bright spot
in my life.
I have not writen for a [[end page]]

[[start page]] catalogue of Norwich Un.
yet. I have not given up all hope
of going there, I mean to go
there or some other good military
school yet and finish my
education.
Norwic Our religious interest
is still kept up and I hope I
profited by them. I do not live
as I ought I know but I pray
for strength and I ask your prayers
also.
I am sorry to Herbert is so sick.
I hope he will soon be better.
You spoke about my spending
my vacation here, I do not
hardly wish to. But if you
think best, I will. I
I should like to have you come
and see me verry much.
How slowly this war drags along
it is either to muddy or esle to
dry to hot or to cold and [[end page]]

[[start page]] whatever weather we have it is
not the kind to suit our
splendid generals. with the exception
of general Burnside all our the
principles our generals seem to
have (our leading ones, I mean) is
to feather their own nest well and
lay the blame on other men
shoulders. but general Burnside,
“the noblest Roman of them all,”
takes all the blame on himself
while things which come to light
of there own accord show that he
was not wholy to blame but that
some of his generals acted in
such a maner that if they had
had a Napoleon instead of a
Burnside, they might not be where
they are to day.
You see, I am trying to put your
advice into practice and to be
cheerfull.
I received a letter yesterday [[end page]]

[[start page]] from Uncle Abraham. He seem cheerful and happy.
But as it is getting late, I must
close. Please give my respects to
Mrs. Warren and tell Herbert
I hope he will soon be out again.

Yours truly,

Eugene C. Houghton

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