Samuel Phillips’s Speech to “Federalists”

Lt. Gov. Samuel Phillips’s Speech to his fellow Federalists (late 18th – early 19th century)

The original document can be found in Box 3, folder 5 of the Phillips Family Collection.

Text:

Federalists!

“Yet a little sleep, a little slum-
“ber, a little folding of the hands to sleep.” Is this
your prayer? If not, it is your practice. So
shall your destruction come upon you, as an armed man,
when the adversaries of your independence & government
are active, organized, in the field; is it in character for you to be
found in your beds? When their scouts
are reconnoitring in every part; why sit ye still? Be-
live, & realize that revolution has not yet had its perfect
work. All the republics in Europe are overturned; but
the American yet stands. Suffer the adversary to upset
the federal administration by influency [on] your State elections
& the work is done. Your degradation complete. The train
is laid, preparations are nocking, & the moment hastening to touch,
Rouse them to action. O Merchants, let not private inducements
engross all your energies. Remember your country,
& sacrifice a little at her shrine. Ye men of fortune,
indulge not inglorious ease, when destruction is at the
door. Worthy farmers, the stability of our country,
sleep not, while the enemy is sowing tang. Merachies [ill] & men
of every description, awake, look about you,
see your danger, be active, & make your escape. Be not deceived
Your destruc-
tion of a long time slumbereth not. Men of the altar, tremble
for the ark. Christianity is attacked, as a debasing superstition.
Men of talents, who feel the danger, employ your pens. And let Prin-

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ters, till the danger is overpast [sic],
prefer judicious, important, patriotic communications, to juvenile essays
and frightening advertisements. All. who love their country more than
private gain, will cheerfully acquiesce; & those who do not,
though they profess to be Federalists, are not true Patriots. “Oh, that my People
were wise, that they would consider!”

Patriotism

Oliver Wendell Holmes Library || Phillips Academy