Stuart J. Northrop ’43 Fund

Each calendar year a number of titles are purchased through the Stuart J. Northrop ’43 Fund. This is the list of titles purchased during the 2017-2018 Academic year.

Established in 1997 in memory of Stuart J. Northrop, class of 1943, by his family, classmates and friends for library acquisitions.

In addition, the following electronic resources were supported: Chicago Guide to Fact Checking and Women’s Magazine.


  • 616.85 R38
    Returning soldiers and PTSD
    Publication Year:2017
    Summary:One of the most painful and tragic legacies of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan has been the trauma suffered by those who served and the far-reaching consequences and after-effects of their scarring combat experiences. This very important volume looks at the issue of returning soldiers PTSD from multiple angles, examining skyrocketing suicide rates; the debates surrounding the quality and accessibility of health care; the nature of and stigmas associated with a PTSD diagnosis; the responsibility that government and society have to care for returning soldiers; how welcoming, protective, and supportive the environment is to which soldiers return; and the steep cost of war to the individual, families, and society at large. Full-Color Photographs, Bibliography, Detailed Table of Contents, Further Information Section, Index, Primary Sources, Websites.


  • 622.3 F72
    Fracking
    Publication Year:2018
    Summary:On the surface, fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, seems like a perfect solution to the countrys energy crises. It is a relatively easy and independent way to supply natural gas. But controversies surround the practice. The process involved in fracking has been shown to be harmful to the environment and a threat to our public health. Do the benefits of fracking outweigh the costs? Can improvements be made to the process that would eliminate its dangers? Should the government get more involved in regulating fracking, or should it be up to the people?


  • 322.4 P66
    The political elite and special interests
    Publication Year:2017
    Summary:There is a growing sense that government is no longer of the people, by the people, and for the people. Many believe that society is manipulated by a handful of political elites and special interests. But why does each party feel that it is the elites and special interests of the other party who are in control of things? Does one person one vote still hold sway? Is this still a citizen democracy, or has it evolved into an oligarchy? Whose voice and vote really count? These and other questions and debates concerning power, influence, and who wields it are at the center of this fascinating collection of articles drawn from across the political spectrum. Full-Color Photographs, Bibliography, Detailed Table of Contents, Further Information Section, Index, Primary Sources, Websites.


  • 322.44 P66
    Political correctness
    Publication Year:2018
    Summary:Political correctness, better known as PC, flourished in institutions of higher learning in the 1990s. With the rise of social media, a second wave of PC culture has emerged that is more aggressive than the first. It seems to many that nearly everyone is a target, at risk of being labeled a racist or misogynist based on one short tweet. The movement, though intended to be inclusive and pluralistic, has its detractors. Is political correctness protective or is it an attack on freedom? Do knee-jerk reactions cancel out the opportunity for thoughtful discourse? And what does this culture mean for our future? Full-Color Photographs, Bibliography, Detailed Table of Contents, Further Information Section, Index, Primary Sources, Websites.


  • 325.73 B62
    The border wall with Mexico
    Publication Year:2018
    Summary:To some, the idea of a border wall with Mexico represents a necessary and practical barrier to illegal immigration and the perceived host of ills that are associated with it. To others, it is both an unrealistic and inhumane effort that demonizes desperate individuals and families who are only seeking a better life. The debate is fierce and is bound up with competing notions of crime, ethnicity, opportunity, fairness, justice, and what America promises, offers, stands for, and represents. All sides of the debate are presented here, and each is given a fair and respectful hearing, allowing readers to sift through fact and opinion, evaluate the strength of arguments, and form an educated opinion on the issue. Full-Color Photographs, Bibliography, Detailed Table of Contents, Further Information Section, Index, Primary Sources, Websites.


  • 364.16 IN8
    Internet abuses and privacy rights
    Publication Year:2017


  • 364.2 H66
    Homelessness and street crime
    Publication Year:2018
    Summary:Hundreds of thousands of Americans are without a home, sleeping on streets or in temporary shelters. Nearly one-fifth of homeless Americans suffer from an untreated mental illness. Due in part to reductions in state and city budgets, many who need assistance are left to live on the street. One natural byproduct of a life on the street is criminal behavior, as adaptation to illegal acts becomes a matter of survival. Could ending homelessness reduce crime? What are ways in which that could be achieved, and whose responsibility is it? Are the homeless being unfairly blamed for street crime? This volume offers a close examination of the issue from a variety of viewpoints.

Stuart J Northop '43 Fund


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