Louis J. “Skip” Elsas II, M.D.’54 Fund

Each calendar year a number of titles are purchased through the Louis J. “Skip” Elsas II, M.D. ’54 Fund. This is the list of titles purchased during the 2016-2017 Academic year.

Established in 2015 by classmates of Skip Elsas, the PA Class of 1954, for purchase of science books, specifically those related to genetics.


  • REF 509 SCI27 V.7
    Science and its times : understanding the social significance of scientific discovery
    Summary:“This series discusses how the major fields of science developed during specific time periods. Each volume focuses on a range of years and includes developments in exploration, life sciences, mathematics, physical sciences, and technology. When the series is completed, the seven volumes will cover 2000 B.C. to the present.”–“Outstanding Reference Sources,” American Libraries, May 2001.




  • BRACE 305.3 B82F
    Browning, Frank
    The fate of gender : nature, nurture, and the human future
    Summary:“Frank Browning takes us into human gender geographies around the world, from gender-neutral kindergartens in Chicago and Oslo to femminielli weather casters in Naples, from conservative Catholics in Paris fearful of God and Nature to transsexual Mormon parents in Utah. As he shares specific and engaging human stories, he also elucidates the neuroscience that distinguishes male and female biology, shows us how all parents’ brains change during the first weeks of parenthood, and finally how men’s and women’s responses to age differ worldwide based not on biology but on their earlier life habits. Starting with Simone de Beauvoir’s world-famous observation that one is not born a woman but instead becomes a woman, Browning goes on to show equally that no one is born a man but learns how to perform as a man, and that there is no fixed way of being masculine or feminine. Increasingly, the categories of “male” and “female” and even “gay” and “straight” seem old-fashioned and reductive. Just visible on the horizon is a world of gender and sexual fluidity that will remake our world in fundamental ways. Linking science to culture and behavior, and delving into the lives of individuals challenging historic notions, Browning questions the traditional division of Nature vs. Nurture in everything from plant science to sexual expression, arguing in the end that life consists of an endless waltz between these two ancient notions”–


  • TW 509.22 IG6W
    Ignotofsky, Rachel
    Women in science : 50 fearless pioneers who changed the world
    Summary:A collection of artworks inspired by the lives and achievements of fifty famous women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, from the ancient world to the present, profiles each notable individual.


  • 150 J29T
    Jay, Mike
    This way madness lies


  • 150 K11ON
    Kagan, Jerome
    On being human : why mind matters
    Summary:“Kagan relies on the evidence to argue that thoughts and emotions are distinct from their biological and genetic bases. In separate chapters he deals with the meaning of words, kinds of knowing, the powerful influence of social class, the functions of education, emotion, morality, and other issues. And without fail he sheds light on these ideas while remaining honest to their complexity.” — From dust jacket.


  • 616.89 M28C
    Marchant, Jo
    Cure : a journey into the science of mind over body
    Summary:“A rigorous, skeptical, deeply reported look at the new science behind the mind’s extraordinary ability to heal the body … While we accept that stress or anxiety can damage our health, the idea of “healing thoughts” was long ago hijacked by New Age gurus and spiritual healers. Recently, however, serious scientists from a range of fields have been uncovering evidence that our thoughts, emotions, and beliefs can ease pain, heal wounds, fend off infection and heart disease, even slow the progression of AIDS and some cancers. In Cure, award-winning science writer Jo Marchant travels the world to meet the physicians, patients, and researchers on the cutting edge of this new world of medicine. We learn how meditation protects against depression and dementia, how social connections increase life expectancy, and how patients who feel cared for recover from surgery faster. We meet Iraq war veterans who are using a virtual arctic world to treat their burns and children whose ADHD is kept under control with half the normal dose of medication. We watch as a transplant patient uses the smell of lavender to calm his hostile immune system and an Olympic runner shaves vital seconds off his time through mind-power alone. Drawing on the very latest research, Marchant explores the vast potential of the mind’s ability to heal, acknowledges its limitations, and explains how we can make use of the findings in our own lives”– Provided by publisher.


  • 572 M23L
    Mcfadden, Johnjoe
    Life on the edge : the coming of age of quantum biology
    Summary:Life is the most extraordinary phenomenon in the known universe; but how does it work? It is remarkable that in this age of cloning and even synthetic biology, nobody has ever made anything living entirely out of dead material. Life remains the only way to make life. Are we missing a vital ingredient in its creation? Like Richard Dawkins’ The Selfish Gene which provided a new perspective on evolution by shifting the focus of natural selection from organisms to genes, Life On The Edge alters our understanding of life from cells or biomolecules to the fundamental particles that drive life’s dynamics. From this new perspective, life makes more sense as its missing ingredient is revealed to be quantum mechanics and the strange phenomena that lie at the heart of this most mysterious of sciences.


  • 616 M95G
    Mukherjee, Siddhartha
    The gene : an intimate history
    Summary:The Pulitzer Prize-winning author draws on his scientific knowledge and research to describe the magisterial history of a scientific idea, the quest to decipher the master-code of instructions that makes and defines humans; that governs our form, function, and fate; and that determines the future of our children. The story of the gene begins in earnest in an obscure Augustinian abbey in Moravia in 1856 where Gregor Mendel, a monk working with pea plants, stumbles on the idea of a “unit of heredity.” It intersects with Darwin’s theory of evolution, and collides with the horrors of Nazi eugenics in the 1940s. The gene transforms postwar biology. It invades discourses concerning race and identity and provides startling answers to some of the most potent questions coursing through our political and cultural realms. It reorganizes our understanding of sexuality, gender identity, sexual orientation, temperament, choice, and free will, thus raising the most urgent questions affecting our personal realms. Above all, the story of the gene is driven by human ingenuity and obsessive minds–from Mendel and Darwin to Francis Crick, James Watson, and Rosalind Franklin to the thousands of scientists working today to understand the code of codes. Woven through the book is the story of Mukherjee’s own family and its recurring pattern of schizophrenia, a haunting reminder that the science of genetics is not confined to the laboratory but is vitally relevant to everyday lives. The moral complexity of genetics reverberates even more urgently today as we learn to “read” and “write” the human genome–unleashing the potential to change the fates and identities of our children and our children’s children.–Adapted from dust jacket.


  • 618.92 N34AT
    Schwarz, Alan
    ADHD nation : children, doctors, big pharma, and the making of an American epidemic
    Summary:“A groundbreaking and definitive account of the widespread misdiagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder–and its serious effects on children, adults, and society. More than 1 in 7 American children are getting diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)–three times what experts have said is appropriate–making it one of the most mishandled and debated conditions in medicine. The numbers are rising every year. Now doctors and Big Pharma are targeting adults and the rest of the world to get diagnosed with ADHD and take medications that will “transform their lives.” In ADHD Nation, Alan Schwarz takes readers behind the scenes to show the roots and rise of this cultural and medical phenomenon: There’s the father of ADHD, Dr. Keith Conners, who spends fifty years pioneering the disorder and use of drugs like Ritalin before realizing his role in what he now calls “a national disaster of dangerous proportions”; a troubled young girl and studious, teenaged boy who get entangled in the growing ADHD machine and take medications that cause them serious problems; and a pharmaceutical industry that egregiously overpromotes the disorder and earns billions from the mishandling of children (and now adults). While demonstrating that ADHD is real and can be successfully medicated, Schwarz sounds an alarm and urges America to wake up and address this growing national problem”–,”A groundbreaking and definitive account of the widespread misdiagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder–and its serious effects on children, adults, and society”–


  • 612.8 SH37N
    Shepherd, Gordon M
    Neurogastronomy : how the brain creates flavor and why it matters
    Summary:Challenging the belief that the sense of smell diminished during human evolution, Shepherd argues that this sense, which constitutes the main component of flavor, is far more powerful and essential than previously believed. –from publisher description


  • 616.85 SI2N
    Silberman, Steve
    Neurotribes : the legacy of autism and the future of neurodiversity
    Summary:“A groundbreaking book that upends conventional thinking about autism and suggests a broader model for acceptance, understanding, and full participation in society for people who think differently. What is autism: a devastating developmental disorder, a lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is all of these things and more–and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. WIRED reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years. Going back to the earliest days of autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle, while mapping out a path for our society toward a more humane world in which people with learning differences and those who love them have access to the resources they need to live happier, healthier, more secure, and more meaningful lives. Along the way, he reveals the untold story of Hans Asperger, the father of Asperger’s syndrome, whose “little professors” were targeted by the darkest social-engineering experiment in human history; exposes the covert campaign by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner to suppress knowledge of the autism spectrum for fifty years; and casts light on the growing movement of “neurodiversity” activists seeking respect, support, technological innovation, accommodations in the workplace and in education, and the right to self-determination for those with cognitive differences” — Provided by publisher.


  • 150 W34M
    Wegner, Daniel M
    The mind club : who thinks, what feels, and why it matters
    Summary:“From dogs to gods, the science of understanding mysterious minds–including your own. Nothing seems more real than the minds of other people. When you consider what your boss is thinking or whether your spouse is happy, you are admitting them into the “mind club.” It’s easy to assume other humans can think and feel, but what about a cow, a computer, a corporation? What kinds of mind do they have? Daniel M. Wegner and Kurt Gray are award-winning psychologists who have discovered that minds–while incredibly important–are a matter of perception. Their research opens a trove of new findings, with insights into human behavior that are fascinating, frightening and funny. The Mind Club explains why we love some animals and eat others, why people debate the existence of God so intensely, how good people can be so cruel, and why robots make such poor lovers. By investigating the mind perception of extraordinary targets–animals, machines, comatose people, god–Wegner and Gray explain what it means to have a mind, and why it matters so much. Fusing cutting-edge research and personal anecdotes, The Mind Club explores the moral dimensions of mind perception with wit and compassion, revealing the surprisingly simple basis for what compels us to love and hate, to harm and to protect”–



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