John E. Dawson Memorial Fund

Each calendar year a number of titles are purchased through the John E. Dawson Memorial Fund. This is the list of titles purchased during the 2016-2017 Academic year.

Established in 1990 by Mrs. Elizabeth B. Dawson and family, of Dover, MA, in memory of her husband, John E. Dawson, class of 1946. Income used for the purchase of books for the Oliver Wendell Holmes Library.

In addition, the following electronic resources are funded.
Informe Academico


  • DVD VIR
    Viridiana
    Summary:Viridiana, who is about to become a nun, does her utmost to maintain her Catholic principles, but her lecherous uncle and a motley assemblage of paupers force her to confront the limits of her idealism.


  • DVD MAL
    Bad education = La mala educación : a film
    Summary:Narrates the reunion of two young men in early 80s Madrid, as the city starts to breathe a new air of freedom. Fifteen years earlier, in the darkness of a Catholic school, the two young men had discovered sensuality and a common hatred of the priests from whom they received their bad education. Now, in the new and liberated Madrid, both men, a film-maker and an aspiring actor, revisit their early years together. As they try to uncover the truth about themselves, each other and the other characters in their story, they realise that things and people are not as they first seem.


  • DVD GIR
    La niña de tus ojos Girl of your dreams
    Summary:In Civil War torn Spain, Germany invites a group of filmmakers to shoot two versions of the Andalusian musical drama “The girl of your dreams” in Berlin. Happy to leave the war behind them, the troupe of Spaniards starts filming in Hitler’s Berlin. The hospitality upon their arrival has more to do with the youthful charms of Macarena Granada. What’s more, the only Andalusion-looking extras in Germany are the gypsies and Jewish prisoners in a nearby concentration camp. When Macarena befriends one of the prisoners, the troupe must decide if the movie is more important than their lives.


  • DVD WOM
    Women on the verge of a nervous breakdown Mujeres al borde de un ataque de “nervios”
    Summary:Comedy film about a woman who has been jilted by the love of her life, her friend who discovers her lover is a a Shiite terrorist, and her ex-lover’s crazed wife.


  • 155.4 B456C
    Berk, Laura E
    Child development


  • FICTION B6377D
    Bolano, Roberto
    Distant star
    Summary:The star in this hair-raising novel is Alberto Ruiz-Tagle, an Air Force pilot who exploits the 1973 coup in Chile to launch his own version of the New Chilean Poetry, a multimedia enterprise that symbolizes the darkness of Pinochet’s regime.




  • FICTION B9771PT
    Butler, Octavia E
    Parable of the talents
    Summary:Environmental devastation and economic chaos have turned America into a land of depravity. Taking advantage of the situation, a zealous bigot wins his way into the White House. Lauren Olamina leads a new faith group directly opposed to the new government. This is the story of the group’s struggle to preserve its vision.


  • 305.42 H15G
    Halberstam, Judith
    Gaga feminism : sex, gender, and the end of normal
    Summary:Analyzes the transformative political and societal shifts of recent decades that have paved the way for revolutionary conceptualizations of gender and marriage, using Lady Gaga as a symbol of a new era that embraces sexual fluidity.


  • BRACE 305.48 H28SI
    Harris Perry, Melissa V
    Sister citizen : shame, stereotypes, and Black women in America
    Summary:Jezebel’s sexual lasciviousness, Mammy’s devotion, and Sapphire’s outspoken anger — these are among the most persistent stereotypes that black women encounter in contemporary American life. Hurtful and dishonest, such representations force African American women to navigate a virtual crooked room that shames them and shapes their experiences as citizens. Many respond by assuming a mantle of strength that may convince others, and even themselves, that they do not need help. But as a result, the unique political issues of black women are often ignored and marginalized. In this groundbreaking book, Melissa V. Harris-Perry uses multiple methods of inquiry, including literary analysis, political theory, focus groups, surveys, and experimental research, to understand more deeply black women’s political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images. Not a traditional political science work concerned with office-seeking, voting, or ideology, Sister Citizen instead explores how African American women understand themselves as citizens and what they expect from political organizing. Harris-Perry shows that the shared struggle to preserve an authentic self and secure recognition as a citizen links together black women in America, from the anonymous survivors of Hurricane Katrina to the current First Lady of the United States.,Includes primary source material.


  • Children’s Collection H44AM
    Herthel, Jessica
    I am Jazz
    Summary:Presents the story of a transgender child who traces her early awareness that she is a girl in spite of male anatomy and the acceptance she finds through a wise doctor who explains her natural transgender status.


  • 792.7 K43Y
    Klein, Jessi
    You’ll grow out of it
    Summary:“YOU’LL GROW OUT OF IT hilariously, and candidly, explores the journey of the twenty-first century woman. As both a tomboy and a late bloomer, comedian Jessi Klein grew up feeling more like an outsider than a participant in the rites of modern femininity. In YOU’LL GROW OUT OF IT, Klein offers-through an incisive collection of real-life stories-a relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond. These include her “transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man,” attempting to find watchable porn, and identifying the difference between being called “ma’am” and “miss” (“Miss sounds like you weigh ninety-nine pounds”). Raw, relatable, and consistently hilarious, YOU’LL GROW OUT OF IT is a one-of-a-kind book by a singular and irresistible comic voice”–




  • FICTION L6457W
    Lindsey, Odie
    We come to our senses : stories
    Summary:“For readers of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk and Redeployment, a searing debut exploring the lives of veterans returning to their homes in the South. Lacerating and lyrical, We Come to Our Senses centers on men and women affected by combat directly and tangentially, and the peculiar legacies of war. The story “Evie M.” is about a vet turned office clerk whose petty neuroses derail even her suicide; in “We Come to Our Senses,” a hip young couple leaves the city for the sticks, trading film festivals for firearms; in “Colleen” a woman redeploys to her Mississippi hometown, and confronts the superior who abused her at war; and in “11/19/98” a couple obsesses over sitcoms and retail catalogs, extracting joy and deeper meaning. The story “Hers” is about the sexual politics of a combat zone” —


  • TW FICTION L735B
    Littlewood, Kathryn
    Bliss
    Summary:Twelve-year-old Rose Bliss wants to work magic in her family’s bakery as her parents do, but when they are called away and Rose and her siblings are left in charge, the magic goes awry and a beautiful stranger tries to talk Rose into giving her the Bliss Cookery Booke.


  • 365 L66C
    Looman, Mary D
    A country called prison : mass incarceration and the making of a new nation
    Summary:“The United States is the world leader in incarcerating citizens. 707 people out of every 100,000 are imprisoned. If those currently incarcerated in the US prison system were a country, it would be the 102nd most populated nation in the world. Aside from looking at the numbers, if we could look at prison from a new viewpoint, as its own country rather than an institution made up of walls and wires, policies and procedures, and legal statutes, what might we be able to learn? In A Country Called Prison, Mary Looman and John Carl attempt to answer this question by proposing a paradigm shift in the way that American society views mass incarceration. Weaving together sociological and psychological principles, theories of political reform, and real-life stories from experiences working in prison and with at-risk families, Looman and Carl form a foundation of understanding to demonstrate that prison is a culture, not purely an institution made up of fences, building, and policies. Prison continues well after incarceration, as ex-felons leave correctional facilities without legal identification of American citizenship, without money, and often return to impoverished neighborhoods. Imprisoned in the isolation of poverty, these legal aliens turn to illegal ways of providing for themselves and often return to prison. This situation is unsustainable and America is clearly facing an incarceration epidemic that requires a new perspective to eradicate it. A Country Called Prison offers concrete, doable, and economical suggestions to reform not only the prison system, but also to help prisoners return to a healthier life after incarceration”–,”The United States is the world leader in incarceration. We imprison 716 people out of every 100,000 – compare that to Canada (118), France (101), Mexico (210), Japan (51)… even Russia can only manage a prison population rate of 472. The total US prison population is over 2.25 million, greater than the population of 100 different countries. In fact, if the US prison system were a country, it would be the 142nd most populous nation on earth, falling between Jamaica and Namibia. But besides comparisons based on sheer numbers, what might we learn if we viewed prison as a country? In A Country Called Prison, Mary Looman and John Carl will use this question as the starting point for a novel thought experiment”–


  • 616.89 M48UN
    Mendes, Gabriel N
    Under the strain of color : Harlem’s Lafargue Clinic and the promise of an antiracist psychiatry
    Summary:Includes primary source material.


  • 641.3 OC6B
    Oconnell, John
    The book of spice : from anise to zedoary
    Summary:“At once familiar and exotic, spices are rare things, comforting us in favorite dishes while evoking far-flung countries, Arabian souks, colonial conquests and vast fortunes. John O’Connell introduces us to spices and their unique properties, both medical and magical, alongside the fascinating histories behind both kitchen staples and esoteric luxuries,”–Amazon.com.


  • 782.4 SP84B
    Springsteen, Bruce
    Born to run
    Summary:Over the past seven years, Bruce Springsteen has privately devoted himself to writing the story of his life, bringing to these pages the same honesty, humor, and originality found in his songs. He describes growing up Catholic in Freehold, New Jersey, amid the poetry, danger, and darkness that fueled his imagination, leading up to the moment he refers to as “The Big Bang”: seeing Elvis Presley’s debut on The Ed Sullivan Show. He vividly recounts his relentless drive to become a musician, his early days as a bar band king in Asbury Park, and the rise of the E Street Band. With disarming candor, he also tells for the first time the story of the personal struggles that inspired his best work, and shows us why the song “Born to Run” reveals more than we previously realized.


  • TW FICTION R7975HA8
    Thorne, Jack
    Harry Potter and the cursed child : The official script book of the original West End production special rehearsal edition Parts I & II
    Summary:As an overworked employee of the Minestry of Magic, a husband, and a father, Harry Potter struggles with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs while his youngest son, Albus finds the weight of the family legacy difficult to bear.


  • FICTION T661G
    Towles, Amor
    A gentleman in Moscow
    Summary:In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery.


  • 796.32 W66B
    Woodbine, Onaje X O
    Black gods of the asphalt : religion, hip-hop, and street basketball
    Summary:J-Rod moves like a small tank on the court, his face mean, staring down his opponents. “I play just like my father,” he says. “Before my father died, he was a problem on the court. I’m a problem.” Playing basketball for him fuses past and present, conjuring his father’s memory into a force that opponents can feel in each bone-snapping drive to the basket. On the street, every ballplayer has a story. Onaje X. O. Woodbine, a former streetball player who became an all-star Ivy Leaguer, brings the sights and sounds, hopes and dreams of street basketball to life. He shows that big games have a trickster figure and a master of black talk whose commentary interprets the game for audiences. The beats of hip-hop and reggae make up the soundtrack, and the ballplayers are half-men, half-heroes, defying the ghetto’s limitations with their flights to the basket. Basketball is popular among young black American men but not because, as many claim, they are “pushed by poverty” or “pulled” by white institutions to play it. Black men choose to participate in basketball because of the transcendent experience of the game. Through interviews with and observations of urban basketball players, Onaje X. O. Woodbine composes a rare portrait of a passionate, committed, and resilient group of athletes who use the court to mine what urban life cannot corrupt. If people turn to religion to reimagine their place in the world, then black streetball players are indeed the hierophants of the asphalt. (from inside book jacket).,Contains primary source material.


  • 181.4 Y75A
    Yogananda
    Autobiography of a yogi

John E Dawson Memorial Fund


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