Broderick Haskell Fund

Each calendar year a number of titles are purchased through the Broderick Haskell Fund. This is the list of titles purchased during the 2016-2017 Academic year.

Established in 1987 by bequest of Broderick Haskell, class of 1918, of New York, NY, for the purposes of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Library, particularly for the acquisition, maintenance, and restoration of Americana, including, but not limited to, books, prints, and maps of unusual quality and historical significance. In addition, the following electronic resources are supported.

Alexander Street: Provides material across all relevant musical genres—American, world, classical, and jazz.

Project Muse: A unique collaboration between libraries and publishers, providing 100% full-text, affordable and user-friendly online access to a comprehensive selection of prestigious humanities and social sciences journals.






  • 973 T23Y
    Yellow peril! : an archive of anti-Asian fear
    Summary:“The “yellow peril” is one of the most long-standing and pervasive racist ideas in Western culture–indeed, this book traces its history to the Enlightenment era. Yet while Fu Manchu evokes a fading historical memory, yellow peril ideology persists, animating, for example, campaign commercials from the 2012 presidential election. Yellow Peril! is the first comprehensive repository of anti-Asian images and writing, pop culture artifacts and political polemic. Written by two leading scholars and replete with paintings, photographs and images drawn from dime novels, posters, comics, theatrical productions, movies, polemical and pseudo-scholarly literature, and other pop culture ephemera, this book is both a unique and fascinating archive and a modern analysis of this crucial historical formation”–




  • REF 509 SCI27 V.1
    Science and its times : understanding the social significance of scientific discovery
    Summary:“This series discusses how the major fields of science developed during specific time periods. Each volume focuses on a range of years and includes developments in exploration, life sciences, mathematics, physical sciences, and technology. When the series is completed, the seven volumes will cover 2000 B.C. to the present.”–“Outstanding Reference Sources,” American Libraries, May 2001.






  • 346.73 C36L
    Cenziper, Debbie
    Love wins : the lovers and lawyers who fought the landmark case for marriage equality
    Summary:“The fascinating and very moving story of the lovers, lawyers, judges and activists behind the groundbreaking Supreme Court case that led to one of the most important, national civil rights victories in decades–the legalization of same-sex marriage. In June 2015, the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage the law in all fifty states in a decision as groundbreaking as Roe v Wade and Brown v Board of Education. Through insider accounts and access to key players, this definitive account reveals the dramatic and previously unreported events behind Obergefell v Hodges and the lives at its center. This is a story of law and love–and a promise made to a dying man who wanted to know how he would be remembered. Twenty years ago, Jim Obergefell and John Arthur fell in love in Cincinnati, Ohio, a place where gays were routinely picked up by police and fired from their jobs. In 2013, the Supreme Court ruled that the federal government had to provide married gay couples all the benefits offered to straight couples. Jim and John–who was dying from ALS–flew to Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal. But back home, Ohio refused to recognize their union, or even list Jim’s name on John’s death certificate. Then they met Al Gerhardstein, a courageous attorney who had spent nearly three decades advocating for civil rights and who now saw an opening for the cause that few others had before him. This forceful and deeply affecting narrative–Part Erin Brockovich, part Milk, part Still Alice–chronicles how this grieving man and his lawyer, against overwhelming odds, introduced the most important gay rights case in U.S. history. It is an urgent and unforgettable account that will inspire readers for many years to come”–,”The inspiring true story of the lovers and lawyers behind one of the most important national civil rights victories in decades- the legalization of same-sex marriage in all fifty states”–




  • 972.9 D92S
    Dunn, Richard S
    Sugar and slaves : the rise of the planter class in the English West Indies, 1624-1713
    Summary:First published by UNC Press in 1972, Sugar and Slaves presents a vivid portrait of English life in the Caribbean more than three centuries ago. Using a host of contemporary primary sources, Richard Dunn traces the development of plantation slave society in the region. He examines sugar production techniques, the vicious character of the slave trade, the problems of adapting English ways to the tropics, and the appalling mortality rates for both blacks and whites that made these colonies the richest, but in human terms the least successful, in English America.,Contains primary source material.










  • 909.82 J63M
    Johnson, Paul
    Modern times : the world from the twenties to the nineties
    Summary:“This work is published in England under the title: A history of the modern world: from 1917 to the 1980’s”–Title page verso.,The history of the 20th century is marked by two great narratives: nations locked in savage wars over ideology and territory, and scientists overturning the received wisdom of preceding generations. For Paul Johnson, the modern era begins with one of the second types of revolutions, in 1919, when English astronomer Sir Arthur Eddington translated observations from a solar eclipse into proof of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, which turned Newtonian physics on its head. Eddington’s research became an international cause célèbre: “No exercise in scientific verification, before or since, has ever attracted so many headlines or become a topic of universal conversation,” Johnson writes, and it made Einstein into science’s first real folk hero. Einstein looms large over Johnson’s narrative, as do others who sought to harness the forces of nature and society: men like Mao Zedong, “a big, brutal, earthy and ruthless peasant,” and Adolf Hitler, creator of “a brutal, secure, conscience-less, successful, and, for most Germans, popular regime.” Johnson takes a contentious conservative viewpoint throughout: he calls the 1960s “America’s suicide attempt,” deems the Watergate affair “a witch-hunt … run by liberals in the media,” and deems the rise of Margaret Thatcher a critical element in Western civilization’s “recovery of freedom”–arguable propositions all, but ones advanced in a stimulating and well-written narrative that provides much food for thought in the course of its more than 800 pages. –Amazon.com




  • 364.4 K52R
    Klarevas, Louis
    Rampage nation : securing America from mass shootings
    Summary:In the past decade, no individual act of violence has killed more people in the United States than the mass shooting. This well-researched, forcefully argued book answers some of the most pressing questions facing our society: Why do people go on killing sprees? Are gun-free zones magnets for deadly rampages? What can we do to curb the carnage of this disturbing form of firearm violence? Contrary to conventional wisdom, the author shows that gun possession often prods aggrieved, mentally unstable individuals to go on shooting sprees; these attacks largely occur in places where guns are not prohibited by law; and sensible gun-control measures like the federal Assault Weapons Ban–which helped drastically reduce rampage violence when it was in effect–are instrumental to keeping Americans safe from mass shootings in the future. To stem gun massacres, the author proposes several original policy prescriptions, ranging from the enactment of sensible firearm safety reforms to an overhaul of how the justice system investigates potential active-shooter threats and prosecutes violent crimes. Calling attention to the growing problem of mass shootings, Rampage Nation demonstrates that this unique form of gun violence is more than just a criminal justice offense or public health scourge. It is a threat to American security. –Amazon.com.




  • Graphic Novel MAR
    Lewis, John
    March. Book three
    Summary:Welcome to the stunning conclusion of the award-winning and best-selling MARCH trilogy. Congressman John Lewis, an American icon and one of the key figures of the civil rights movement, joins co-writer Andrew Aydin and artist Nate Powell to bring the lessons of history to vivid life for a new generation, urgently relevant for today’s world.


  • 301.451 M76A
    Montejo, Esteban
    Biography of a runaway slave


  • 791.43 M96P
    Munsterberg, Hugo
    The Photoplay : a psychological study




  • 179.4 N46F
    Newkirk, Ingrid
    Free the animals! : the untold story of the Animal Liberation Front
    Summary:The shattering account of one woman’s struggle against the forces supporting the abuse of animals, Free the Animals is the best-selling and action-packed story of underground adventure, as well as an eloquent plea for the rights of nonhuman animals. Free the Animals, with an introduction by Chrissie Hynde, is the story of Valerie, a twenty-three-year-old police officer in Montgomery County, Maryland, whose world was turned upside down when she learned about the abuses of animals in laboratories. The book describes how this law-abiding woman came to challenge the system by taking direct action and examines why ordinary people are moved to do extraordinary things on behalf of animals. — Amazon.com.


  • 320.97 P98T
    Purdy, Jedediah
    A tolerable anarchy : rebels, reactionaries, and the making of American freedom
    Summary:The arc has been toward expanding freedom as new generations press against inherited boundaries. But economic forces beyond our control undercut our ideas of self-mastery. Realizing our ideals of freedom today requires the political vision to reform the institutions we share.


  • 320.58 P97AF
    Purdy, Jedediah
    After nature : a politics for the anthropocene
    Summary:“Nature no longer exists apart from humanity. Henceforth, the world we will inhabit is the one we have made. Geologists have called this new planetary epoch the Anthropocene, the Age of Humans. The geological strata we are now creating record industrial emissions, industrial-scale crop pollens, and the disappearance of species driven to extinction. Climate change is planetary engineering without design. These facts of the Anthropocene are scientific, but its shape and meaning are question for politics–a politics that does not yet exist. ‘After Nature’ develops a politics for the post-natural world. Jedediah Purdy begins with a history of how Americans have shaped their landscapes. He explores the competing traditions that still infuse environmental law and culture–a frontier vision of settlement and development, a wilderness-seeking Romanticism, a utilitarian attitude that tries to manage nature for human benefit, and a twentieth-century ecological view. These traditions are ways of seeing the world and humans’ place in it. They are also modes of lawmaking that inscribe ideal visions on the earth itself. Each has shaped landscapes that make its vision of nature real, from wilderness to farmland to suburbs–opening some new ways of living on the earth while foreclosing others. The Anthropocene demands that we draw on all these legacies and go beyond them. With human and environmental fates now inseparable, environmental politics will become either more deeply democratic or more unequal and inhumane. Where nothing is pure, we must create ways to rally devotion to a damaged and ever-changing world.”–Publisher’s description.


  • 940.53 R25H
    Rees, Laurence
    The Holocaust : a new history
    Summary:This landmark work answers two of the most fundamental questions in history – how, and why, did the Holocaust happen? Laurence Rees has spent twenty-five years meeting survivors and perpetrators of the Holocaust. Now, in his magnum opus, he combines their enthralling eyewitness testimony, a large amount of which has never been published before, with the latest academic research to create the first accessible and authoritative account of the Holocaust in more than three decades. This is a new history of the Holocaust in three ways. First, and most importantly, Rees has created a gripping narrative that contains a large amount of testimony that has never been published before. Second, he places this powerful interview material in the context of an examination of the decision making process of the Nazi state, and in the process reveals the series of escalations that cumulatively created the horror. Third, Rees covers all those across Europe who participated in the deaths, and he argues that whilst hatred of the Jews was always at the epicentre of Nazi thinking, what happened cannot be fully understood without considering the murder of the Jews alongside plans to kill millions of non-Jews, including homosexuals, “Gypsies” and the disabled. Through a chronological, intensely readable narrative, featuring enthralling eyewitness testimony and the latest academic research, this is a compelling new account of the worst crime in history.




  • FICTION SO94D
    Soyinka, Wole
    Death and the king’s horseman : authoritative text : backgrounds and contexts, criticism
    Summary:Based on events that took place in 1946 in the ancient Yoruban city of Oyo, Soyinka’s play addresses classic issues of cultural conflict, tragic decision-making, and the psychological mindsets of individuals and groups. The text of the play is accompanied by an introduction and explanatory annotations for the many allusions to traditional Nigerian myth and culture. “Backgrounds and Sources” helps readers understand Death and the King’s Horseman’s traditional African contexts and the role of theater in African culture. Included are a map of Yorubaland, discussions of Yoruban religious beliefs and cultural traditions, Soyinka on the various forms that theater has taken in African culture in order to survive, and Anthony Appiah on Soyinka’s struggle with the problem of African identity in the creation of Death and the King’s Horseman. Commentary on the play as both a theatrical production and a classroom text is provided by Gerald Moore, Tanure Ojaide, and Martin Rohmer. “Criticism” collects nine major essays on the play and the difficulties it presents to readers. Contributors include D.S. Izevbaye, Eldred Durosimi Jones, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Biodun Jeyifo, Wole Soyinka, Joan Hepburn, Adebayo Williams, David Richards, and Olakunle George. A chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included. – Cover.


  • 345.73 ST3C
    Steiker, Carol S
    Courting death : the Supreme Court and capital punishment
    Summary:“Unique among Western democracies in refusing to eradicate the death penalty, the United States has attempted instead to reform and rationalize state death penalty practices through federal constitutional law. Courting Death traces the unusual and distinctive history of top-down judicial regulation of capital punishment under the Constitution and its unanticipated consequences for our time. In the 1960s and 1970s, in the face of widespread abolition of the death penalty around the world, provisions for capital punishment that had long fallen under the purview of the states were challenged in federal courts. The U.S. Supreme Court intervened in two landmark decisions, first by constitutionally invalidating the death penalty in Furman v. Georgia (1972) on the grounds that it was capricious and discriminatory, followed four years later by its restoration in Gregg v. Georgia (1976). Since then, by neither retaining capital punishment in unfettered form nor abolishing it outright, the Supreme Court has created a complex regulatory apparatus that has brought executions in many states to a halt, while also failing to address the problems that led the Court to intervene in the first place. While execution chambers remain active in several states, constitutional regulation has contributed to the death penalty’s new fragility. In the next decade or two, Carol Steiker and Jordan Steiker argue, the fate of the American death penalty is likely to be sealed by this failed judicial experiment. Courting Death illuminates both the promise and pitfalls of constitutional regulation of contentious social issues”–




  • 345.73 T66R
    Toobin, Jeffrey
    The run of his life : the people v. O.J. Simpson
    Summary:“First published less than a year after the infamous verdict, Jeffrey Toobin’s nonfiction masterpiece tells the whole story, from the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman to the ruthless gamesmanship behind the scenes of ‘the trial of the century.”–Back cover.


  • 322.4 T66AM
    Toobin, Jeffrey
    American heiress : the wild saga of the kidnapping, crimes and trial of Patty Hearst
    Summary:Examines the life of Patty Hearst who suffered an unimaginable trauma and then made the stunning decision to join her captors’ crusade.,On February 4, 1974, Patty Hearst, a sophomore in college and heiress to the Hearst family fortune, was kidnapped by a ragtag group of self-styled revolutionaries calling itself the Symbionese Liberation Army. The already sensational story took the first of many incredible twists when the group released a tape of Patty saying she had joined the SLA and had adopted the nom de guerre “Tania.” The weird turns of the tale are truly astonishing–the bank security cameras capturing “Tania” wielding a machine gun during a robbery; a cast of characters including everyone from basketball star Bill Walton to the Black Panthers to Ronald Reagan to F. Lee Bailey; the largest police shoot-out in American history; the first breaking news event to be broadcast live on television across the country; Patty’s year on the lam; and her circuslike trial, after which the term “Stockholm syndrome” entered the lexicon. The saga of Patty Hearst highlighted a decade in which America seemed to be suffering a collective nervous breakdown. Based on more than a hundred interviews and thousands of previously secret documents, Toobin thrillingly recounts the craziness of the times, portraying the lunacy of the half-baked radicals and the toxic mix of sex, politics, and violence that swept up Patty Hearst. He examines the life of a young woman who suffered an unimaginable trauma and then made the stunning decision to join her captors’ crusade. Or did she?–Adapted from dust jacket.


  • 363.73 V25P
    Vallianatos, E G
    Poison spring : the secret history of pollution and the EPA
    Summary:“Imagine walking into a restaurant and finding chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, or neonicotinoid insecticides listed in the description of your entree. They may not be printed in the menu, but many are in your food. These are a few of the literally millions of pounds of approved synthetic substances dumped into the environment every day, not just in the US but around the world. They seep into our water supply, are carried thousands of miles by wind and rain from the site of application, remain potent long after they are deposited, and constitute, in the words of one scientist, “biologic death bombs with a delayed time fuse and which may prove to be, in the long run, as dangerous to the existence of mankind as the arsenal of atom bombs.” All of these poisons are sanctioned–or in some cases, ignored–by the EPA. For twenty-five years E.G. Vallianatos saw the EPA from the inside, with rising dismay over how pressure from politicians and threats from huge corporations were turning it from the public’s watchdog into a “polluter’s protection agency.” Based on his own experience, the testimony of colleagues, and hundreds of documents Vallianatos collected inside the EPA, Poison Spring reveals how the agency has continually reinforced the chemical-industrial complex. Writing with acclaimed environmental journalist McKay Jenkins, E.G. Vallianatos provides a devastating exposé of how the agency created to protect Americans and our environment has betrayed its mission. Half a century after Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring awakened us to the dangers of pesticides, we are poisoning our lands and waters with more toxic chemicals than ever” —


  • 305.56 V26H
    Vance, J D
    Hillbilly elegy : a memoir of a family and culture in crisis
    Summary:Vance, a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, provides an account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America.

Broderick Haskell Fund


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