Hiding Images on the Library Facebook Page

Here’s a simple tip for managing images on your library’s Facebook page. The most recent five images added to your Facebook account display in a row at the top of the page. It’s always the most recent five photos but they display in random order — try reloading your page to see. I mention this because I think it’s confusing, and I’m not sure what the point is of randomizing the order of these.

If you frequently add photographs to your Facebook page, this row of recent photos can help your page look current, but there are times when the most recent photos don’t work so well. If you’ve uploaded more than five photographs of a recent event, for example, these will push other recent images out of the display. Or you may have some recent images like screenshots or logos that don’t really belong in that display.

It’s easy to hide images from the display. Just hover over the image and you’ll see a small x in the upper right. Click on this to hide the image from the display. This only hides it from this row of photos, and the image will still be visible in the album and other photo displays.

Enable Media Replace

This simple WordPress plugin created by Måns Jonasson is useful for almost anyone who maintains a WordPress site of any size, but it’s especially useful if you maintain documentation of any kind and have a frequent need to update screenshots. It does exactly what the name implies — it makes it easy for you to replace one image file (or any other type of file) with another. No more uploading a new file and deleting the old one, or confusion over versions or file names.

Once you install and activate this plugin, you’ll find a new button labelled Replace Media at the bottom of the Edit Media page. Click this and browse and select a file from your computer. You then have two choices — you can either retain the original file name (renaming the file you’re uploading if necessary) or you can replace the file and use the new file name, changing all existing links to the old file to point to the new one. For the first option, you need to be uploading a file of the same type, but for the second option you can replace your original file with one of a different file type, like a gif with a jpg or a Word document with a PDF. Nothing fancy, but a great timesaver!

Enable Media Replace — Read more or download this popular plugin here

Facebook Status Tagging

Facebook’s status tagging feature is a way to include links from one Facebook page to another.

Here’s a status that has a tag in it:

Facebook Status Tagging #3

The words Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day are blue, and are a link to that project’s Facebook page.

It’s easy to add these links, once you know the trick, which is to start by clicking on the option to use Facebook as your page, which is with the other admin options in the right sidebar on your Page. You also need to make sure the page you want to link to is one of your page’s “favorite pages.” You’ll find the option to “Add to My Page’s Favorites” in the lower left sidebar of every page.

In this example, I am writing a status on the NOBLE Facebook page, and I want to refer to Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day Facebook page.

I start my post, but instead of just writing “Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day” I enter the @ sign and start typing Mass… etc. I get a dropdown menu of of my page’s favorite pages:

Facebook Status Tagging #1

I click on Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day, and continue writing my status. The page name appears with a light blue background:

Facebook Status Tagging #2

I click Share, and I’m done.

Two things happen when you use these tags: The name of the Facebook page displays in blue and is a link to that page, and my status also appears on the other page, in the case the Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day. Used appropriately, these tags can build helpful connections between pages. For example, if an author is coming to your library, you might post a status about the event linking to the author Facebook page. The tag will help your users find out more about the author, and the author’s fans will see that he or she is coming to your library.

Embed a Flickr Slideshow the Easy Way

Flickr automatically creates slideshows for your photostream, sets, groups and search results, and it’s easy to embed one of these slideshows in your WordPress post or page.

In this example, we’re using a Flickr set. First, click on the Slideshow link, shown here:

Slideshow

Next, copy the slideshow link to your clipboard. You can find this by clicking on Share in the upper right and using the Grab the URL option, or simply by copying the URL from the location bar.

Then go to your WordPress post or page, and just paste the URL on a new line. That’s right, it’s that simple. You don’t need any embed code or HTML, just the URL itself, and it works in either the HTML or the WYSIWYG editor.

Preview, save and you’re done!

Here’s what your slideshow will look like:

Two Sites that Turn Your Library Photos into Videos

Here are two sites that make it easy to turn a set of library photographs into a fast and fun video to post on YouTube or share on your library website. How about trying one of these for Massachusetts Library Snapshot Day?

Both of these sites have lots of options for selecting photographs, including pulling in a set from Flickr. I find that it’s easier to create a set of 12 – 18 selected photographs and put them into a set on Flickr to use for the video. Both sites are pretty simple to use, especially if you follow the instructions, and both keep adding new features, so I won’t attempt to document them here, but here’s a couple of examples using some of my library photographs.

Animoto

Animoto — Animoto makes photo slideshows that somewhat resemble movie trailers. You select the images you want to use, choose a musical clip from the large assortment provided, and then let Animoto create the video. They match the music and the images to create various animated transition effects, and no two videos are alike. In fact, if you don’t like your first attempt, you can let Animoto try again and you’ll get something different. There are other options here — you can mix video clips in, add some words and upgrade to a Pro account for higher quality, longer videos, different styles and to remove the branding.

Animoto Overview — Check this page for more information on how to get started

Pummelvision

Pummelvision was designed to do one thing only, but to do it well — it creates a rapid slideshow of a large group of photographs matched to a beat. There are few options here, although you do have two choices for the speed: fast or very fast.

Google Tip: Sites with Images

Google has a handy filter that limits search results to sites with images, and displays a selection of the images for each site on the search results page. For many searches, I’m finding that turning this filter on makes it much faster to find the kind of site I’m looking for just by scanning through the search results. When I’m specifically looking for images, I often use this Site with Images feature rather than a Google Images search because I like having the images organized by site and presented with a little more context. It also helps me quickly identify a site with a historical or biographical slant, when that’s what I’m looking for. I also find this useful for travel searches, because even if I’m looking for information, I also want to see pictures, and for any sort of how-to search including cooking, crafts and home repair, because pictures add so much to those site.

You’ll find the Sites with Images filter in the left sidebar, under All Results. For some searches, you may need to click on More Search Tools to see this.

Google Sites with Images

Sample Searches

Here are some sample Google searches with the Sites with Images filter turned on: