Category Archives: History

History Trends

This is a collection of the links related to the brief presentation on History Trends that I am doing at the Massachusetts Library Association Conference tomorrow.

Facial Recognition

Picasa and other image management systems have facial recognition that can help identify and tag people in photographs. Systems need to be taught who people are, but the software can be very useful with historic images as well.

Mass. Memories Road Show

Mass Memories Road Show — Official site where you can search and browse images “The Mass. Memories Road Show is an initiative of the Massachusetts Studies Project at UMass Boston, co-sponsored by Mass Humanities and the Joseph P. Healey Library.”

Mass. Memories Road Show Presentation — Great presentation by Heather Cole, Assistant Director of the Mass. Memories Road Show

“Wakefield Then and Now” Photo Contest

“Wakefield Then & Now” Photo Contest — Contest announcement

“Wakefield Then & Now” Photo Contest Winners — Announcement of the winning photographs

“Wakefield Then & Now” — Flickr set

Corner of Water Street and Wakefield Avenue — Record for a then & now set in the library catalog

Names

World War I Monument
Eastman Building, 1888 — Photograph of the Eastman Building in Melrose, Massachusetts, on Flickr

Jenny Greenwood — Photograph of the grave of Jenny Greenwood, 1851-1862, Laurel Hill Cemetery, Reading, Massachusetts, on Flickr

World War I Monument — Transcription of names and dates from monument in Hamilton, Massachusetts

Places

Revolution of 1689

Boulevard Diner — Worcester Lunch Car Company #730, 1936, on Flickr

Revolution of 1689 — Photograph of Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Marker on Flickr

The Historical Marker Database — Crowdsourced database of historical markers around the world with transcribed text, photographs, longitude and latitude, categories and more

Dr. P.H. Peach, Dentist
Dr. P.H. Peach, Dentist — Screenshot of old advertisement from a book in the Internet Archive on Flickr

Worcester History Images from the Internet Archive — Blog post

$5K homes in Mt. Pleasant, 1905 — From a set of historic images of Washington, DC by rockcreek on Flickr

Solving Mysteries

Hugh Butterworth — Flickr member phototrack123 and his wife buy old portrait photographs, identify the subjects and research the family with a goal of sending the photograph to descendents

Harry Montague as Captain Molyneux in “The Shaugraun” 1875 — Read the comments to see a group working together to identify the subject of this photograph

Unclaimed Persons — Volunteer genealogists work together to identify possible relatives for cases where the identity of the deceased is known but the next of kin is unknown

Mobile

MobileGenealogy.com — “Dedicated to news, reviews and information about mobile devices and genealogy software”

QR codes in use at the Powerhouse Museum — Linking exhibits to more information

Encyclopedia Virginia — Using Layar with the Encyclopedia’s geolocated content out in the real world

Wikitude — Another augmented reality browser that overlays information and images on your view of the world

C-Span Video Archives

The C-SPAN Video Library launched last week, opening up access to an amazing reference resource for students, journalists and anyone interested in history and government. This includes over 160,000 hours of political and public affairs events covered by the C‑SPAN Networks since 1987, free, well-organized, searchable, and easy to share. For example, embedded below is the first day of the Scalia Confirmation Hearing, in which Justice Scalia responded to questions about his views on federal-state relationships, the Constitution, death penalty, abortion, national security versus individual rights and more.


Continue reading

Depression Memories on Video

The New York Times has announced an oral history project called The New Hard Times. Readers are invited to interview friends or family members who lived through the Great Depression, and have them share their memories and offer their advice for surviving hard times.

A good example is this video conversation between 96-year-old business school professor at New York University and one of his students : Professor Ernest Kurnow.

One woman who lived through the Depression has become something of an Internet celebrity sharing her recipes and memories on YouTube. 93-year-old grandmother Clara Cannucciari is the star of a series of videos called Depression Cooking with Clara, made by her grandson, filmmaker Chris Cannucciari. Clara’s old-fashioned, simple cooking and engaging manner have won her many fans.

These videos are also good examples for anyone interested in doing an oral history project for their family or their community. Many people freeze up in a recorded interview, but are more comfortable and natural when they are demonstrating a favorite activity, and the results can be more interesting for the viewer as well.


Depression Cooking with Clara, Episode 4 – Peppers and Eggs

Living Room Candidate

Living Room Candidate — If you’ve had enough of the 2008 election, how about looking to the past? The Living Room Candidate website is a beautifully-designed online exhibit from the Museum of the Moving Image, showcasing presidential campaign commercials from 1952 to 2008. You can explore by year and read a short article about each candidate’s television strategy, or browse by type of commercial (biographical, fear, real people, etc.) or by issue (corruption, taxes, war, etc.)

But the amazing thing here is that you don’t just read about the commercials, you can watch them online and draw your own conclusions about how fair, accurate and effective they were. These primary sources are invaluable for media studies and political history.

Some of these are quite entertaining, too. I love the contrast between two 1952 commercials, Eisenhower’s cartoon “Ike for President” and Stevenson’s torchy “I Love the Gov.” commercial.
Continue reading

Boston Public Library on Flickr

Cabot Street, Beverly, MassachusettsThe Boston Public Library is sharing several collections of artistic and historic images to Flickr, including local brewery posters, rare books, manuscripts, postcards, photographs and much more.

Two collections are of particular interest for local interest to NOBLE libraries. The Tichnor Brothers postcards of New England includes over 1,800 Massachusetts images, including many from our area. These postcards are a good source of images of parks, bridges, statues, libraries, churches and other local landmarks.

The Leon Abdalian collection includes historic sites photographed in 1930 during the Massachusetts Tercentenary celebration, when the Boston Daily Record hired Abdalian as the “Photographer of Historic Shrines,” and it includes some sites in our area, including the Balch House in Beverly.

Building Community Through Photography

I did a presentation on this topic at the Massachusetts Library Association conference in Falmouth this morning, and posted the PowerPoint on Slideshare:

Continue reading