NOBLE for Kids



Presidents Day is February 20th

Washington’s Birthday, also known as Presidents Day, is a federal holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. The holiday was first celebrated in 1879 to honor our first president, George Washington. Until 1971, the holiday was always observed on Washington’s actual birth date, February 22nd. Washington’s Birthday is also a state holiday in many states. Some states have combined Washington’s Birthday with a celebration of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday (February 12th), while others have officially designated the holiday a celebration of American presidents, in general. In Massachusetts, only George Washington is honored on this day.

Learn more about Presidents Day and our American presidents on our page of links.

Lincoln’s Birthday

Abraham Lincoln, America’s sixteenth president, was born on February 12, 1809. A lawyer by training, Lincoln had a successful law practice in Springfield, Illinois and served in both the Illinois House and United States House of Representatives. Lincoln lost his bid for the United States Senate in 1858, but was elected President in 1860. His tenure was marked by the onset of the American Civil War which was triggered by the secession of several slave-holding Southern States from the Union upon his election as president. The bloody war lasted from April 1861 until the Spring of 1865, when the South surrendered. Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth on April 14, 1865, just days after the wars’ end.

See our page of links for more about this fascinating historical figure.

February is Black History Month

During February we celebrate Black History Month, also known as African American History Month. At this time we honor the contributions of African Americans to arts, culture, science, industry and society as a whole throughout American history. Please see our page of links for resources for celebrating African American History Month.

Celebrate Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is an African-American harvest and community festival that was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, as a way of reaffirming African-American identity, instilling knowledge and pride in African roots, and reinforcing bonds among members of the community. Kwanzaa is now celebrated by an estimated 18 million people in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Britain, India and some African nations. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and lasts for seven days.

Kwanzaa is devoted to seven principles, know collectively as Nguzo Saba: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative economics) , Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and Imani (Faith).

Learn more about Kwanzaa on our page of links. Happy Kwanzaa!

Christmastime is here

“Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” — Washington Irving

The Christmas season is upon us. Christmas, celebrated around the world on December 25th, commemorates the birth of Christ and is one of the most important days in the Christian calendar. Though is it a religious observance, Christmas has many cultural manifestations which vary in different countries. In the U.S., familiar traditions include decorating of Christmas trees, singing carols, exchanging gifts, and welcoming Santa Claus on his annual visit.

See our page of links featuring Christmas activities, recipes and book lists.

November is Native American Heritage Month

Native American Heritage Month is a time to honor the culture, traditions and history of America’s indigenous people.

Native American Heritage Month was first celebrated in 1990 by proclamation of President George H.W. Bush and was initially called “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Since 1994, each American President has issued a similar proclamation. Find resources, including booklists and lesson plans, on our page of links