NOBLE for Kids



March is Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month celebrates women’s contributions to our shared social, cultural and political history. Women’s History Month has been observed since 1987 when a Congressional Resolution expanded Women’s History Week to a month-long celebration, which includes International Women’s Day on March 8th. This year’s theme is, “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives”

See our page of links for resources to celebrate Women’s History Month.

George Washington’s Birthday

George Washington, America’s first president, was born on February 22, 1732. A surveyor by trade, Washington became an officer in the Continental Army during the French and Indian War (1754-1763). He was named the commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution (1775-1783). In 1787, Washington served as president of the Constitutional Convention at which the United States Constitution was drafted. He was twice elected president of the fledgling nation, serving from 1789 until 1797. Washington died on December 12, 1799.

See our page of links for more about this fascinating historical figure.

Presidents’ Day

Washington’s Birthday, also known as Presidents’ Day, is a federal holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. The holiday was first celebrated in 1879 to honor our first president, George Washington. Until 1971, the holiday was always observed on Washington’s actual birth date, February 22nd. Washington’s Birthday is also a state holiday in many states. Some states have combined Washington’s Birthday with a celebration of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday (February 12th), while others have officially designated the holiday a celebration of American presidents, in general. In Massachusetts, only George Washington is honored on this day.

Learn more about Presidents’ Day and the presidents on our page of links.

Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day, celebrated on February 2, has its roots in an ancient Celtic celebration called Imbolog. The date is one of the four cross-quarter days of the year, the midpoints between the spring and fall equinoxes and the summer and winter solstice.

Imbolog, marking the midpoint between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, was the most important of the cross-quarter days. In a society dependent on agriculture and therefore on the weather, this was a time to celebrate having made it halfway through winter. The superstition arose that if the weather was fair on Imbolog, the second half of the winter would be cold and stormy, but if the weather was cold and overcast or stormy, the second half of the winter would be mild.

Today we rely upon Punxsutawney Phil, a Pennsylvania groundhog, to let us know what our fate will be. If February 2nd is sunny and Phil sees his shadow, there will be six more weeks of winter weather. If the day is cloudy, we can look forward to an earlier spring. Learn more about Groundhog Day on our page of links.

February is African American History Month

During February we celebrate African American History Month, also known as Black History Month. At this time we pay special attention to the contributions of African Americans to arts, culture, science, industry and society as a whole throughout American history. Please see our page of links for resources for celebrating African American History Month.

Celebrate Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is an African-American harvest and community festival that was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, as a way of reaffirming African-American identity, instilling knowledge and pride in African roots, and reinforcing bonds among members of the community. Kwanzaa is now celebrated by an estimated 18 million people in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Britain, India and some African nations. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and lasts for seven days.

Kwanzaa is devoted to seven principles, know collectively as Nguzo Saba: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative economics) , Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and Imani (Faith).

Learn more about Kwanzaa on our page of links. Happy Kwanzaa!