NOBLE for Kids



Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day, celebrated on February 2, has its roots in an ancient Celtic celebration called Imbolog. The date is one of the four cross-quarter days of the year, the midpoints between the spring and fall equinoxes and the summer and winter solstice.

Imbolog, marking the midpoint between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, was the most important of the cross-quarter days. In a society dependent on agriculture and therefore on the weather, this was a time to celebrate having made it halfway through winter. The superstition arose that if the weather was fair on Imbolog, the second half of the winter would be cold and stormy, but if the weather was cold and overcast or stormy, the second half of the winter would be mild.

Today we rely upon Punxsutawney Phil, a Pennsylvania groundhog, to let us know what our fate will be. If February 2nd is sunny and Phil sees his shadow, there will be six more weeks of winter weather. If the day is cloudy, we can look forward to an earlier spring. Learn more about Groundhog Day on our page of links.

February is African American History Month

During February we celebrate African American History Month, also known as Black History Month. At this time we pay special attention to the contributions of African Americans to arts, culture, science, industry and society as a whole throughout American history. Please see our page of links for resources for celebrating African American History Month.

Celebrate Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is an African-American harvest and community festival that was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, as a way of reaffirming African-American identity, instilling knowledge and pride in African roots, and reinforcing bonds among members of the community. Kwanzaa is now celebrated by an estimated 18 million people in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Britain, India and some African nations. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and lasts for seven days.

Kwanzaa is devoted to seven principles, know collectively as Nguzo Saba: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative economics) , Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and Imani (Faith).

Learn more about Kwanzaa on our page of links. Happy Kwanzaa!

Christmastime is here

“Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” — Washington Irving

The Christmas season is upon us. Christmas, celebrated around the world on December 25th, commemorates the birth of Christ and is one of the most important days in the Christian calendar. Though is it a religious observance, Christmas has many cultural manifestations which vary in different countries. In the U.S., familiar traditions include decorating of Christmas trees, singing carols, exchanging gifts, and welcoming Santa Claus on his annual visit.

See our page of links featuring Christmas activities, recipes and book lists.

Halloween is just around the corner!

Halloween, also known as All Hallows’ Eve, is celebrated each year on October 31st. This popular holiday is commonly celebrated by trick-or-treating, carving jack o’lanterns and general mischief-making.

Halloween links| Halloween Books for Kids

Sukkot begins on October 8th

Sukkot, also known as the “Feast of the Tabernacles” is a week-long celebration that follows the solemn holiday of Yom Kippur. Sukkot commemorates the forty-year period during which the children of Israel were wandering in the desert, living in temporary shelters. Because Sukkot is also associated with the fall harvest, it is also known as the “Festival of Ingathering.” This year, Sukkot begins on October 8th and lasts until October 15th. Learn more about Sukkot on our page of links.