NOBLE for Kids



Celebrate Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is an African-American harvest and community festival that was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, as a way of reaffirming African-American identity, instilling knowledge and pride in African roots, and reinforcing bonds among members of the community. Kwanzaa is now celebrated by an estimated 18 million people in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Britain, India and some African nations. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and lasts for seven days.

Kwanzaa is devoted to seven principles, know collectively as Nguzo Saba: Umoja (Unity), Kujichagulia (Self-Determination), Ujima (Collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (Cooperative economics) , Nia (Purpose), Kuumba (Creativity) and Imani (Faith).

Learn more about Kwanzaa on our page of links. Happy Kwanzaa!

Christmastime is here

“Christmas is a season for kindling the fire for hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.” — Washington Irving

The Christmas season is upon us. Christmas, celebrated around the world on December 25th, commemorates the birth of Christ and is one of the most important days in the Christian calendar. Though is it a religious observance, Christmas has many cultural manifestations which vary in different countries. In the U.S., familiar traditions include decorating of Christmas trees, singing carols, exchanging gifts, and welcoming Santa Claus on his annual visit.

See our page of links featuring Christmas activities, recipes and book lists.

Halloween is just around the corner!

Halloween, also known as All Hallows’ Eve, is celebrated each year on October 31st. This popular holiday is commonly celebrated by trick-or-treating, carving jack o’lanterns and general mischief-making.

Halloween links| Halloween Books for Kids

Sukkot begins on October 8th

Sukkot, also known as the “Feast of the Tabernacles” is a week-long celebration that follows the solemn holiday of Yom Kippur. Sukkot commemorates the forty-year period during which the children of Israel were wandering in the desert, living in temporary shelters. Because Sukkot is also associated with the fall harvest, it is also known as the “Festival of Ingathering.” This year, Sukkot begins on October 8th and lasts until October 15th. Learn more about Sukkot on our page of links.

Yom Kippur is coming

Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement, begins on October 3rd and ends at nightfall on October 4th. Yom Kippur is considered the most sacred holiday on the Jewish calendar and is observed by fasting, prayer and repentance. Learn more about this important observance on our page of links.

Rosh Hashanah is Here!

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins today at sunset. Rosh Hashanah customs include sounding the shofar (a hollowed-out ram’s horn) and eating symbolic foods such as apples dipped in honey to evoke a “sweet new year”. Unlike the secular New Year’s Day celebration on January 1st, Rosh Hashanah is one of the holiest days on the Jewish calendar. Learn more about Rosh Hashanah and find ideas for marking this holiday on our page of links.